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I think my problem is best explained with a code snippet of my class/interface-hierarchy:

public interface ITransform<D> // or <in D> --> seems to make no difference here
{
    void Transform(D data);
}

interface ISelection {}
interface IValue : ISelection {}

public interface IEditor : ITransform<IValue> {}
public interface ISelector : IEditor, ITransform<ISelection> {}

class Value : IValue { ... }
class Editor : IEditor { ... }              // implements ITransform<IValue>
class Selector : Editor, ISelector { ... }  // implements ITransform<ISelection>

Value v = new Value();
Selector s1 = new Selector();
ISelector s2 = s1;

s1.Transform(v); // resolves to ITransform<ISelection> --> WHY?
s2.Transform(v); // resolves to ITransform<IValue>     --> OK

Question 1: Why does s1.Transform(v) resolve to ITransform<ISelection> and not to ITransform<IValue> as in the second case?

Question 2: For Question 1 it seems to make no difference if ITransform is <D> or <in D>. But do you see any other problems with using <in D> in my class/interface-hierarchy? I'm a bit doubtful because of ISelector which implements ITransform<IValue> and ITransform<ISelection>. Might contravariance cause any problems here because IValue inherits ISelection?

EDIT Just to let you know: I'm currently using Silverlight 4 but I think this is the general C# behaviour.

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Here when I declare D as contravariant (in), both resolve to ITransform<ISelection>. –  Julien Mar 2 '12 at 8:48
    
As I said, it seems to make absolutely no difference if ITransform is contravariant or not. For s1 both calls ALWAYS resolve to ITransform<ISelection>. –  Stephan Mar 2 '12 at 9:11
    
I'm not sure we understand each other... What do u mean with "For s1 both calls" ? I do have a difference when ITransform is contravariant : s1.Transform(v) and s2.Transform(v) both resolve to ITransform<ISelection> –  Julien Mar 2 '12 at 9:27
    
Forget that. "For s1 both calls" doesn't make sense. As for your "difference": that's exactly my problem. I thought that s1.Transform(v) would resolve to ITransform<IValue> but it resolves to ITransform<ISelection>. And here it doesn't make a difference if ITransform is contravariant or not. –  Stephan Mar 2 '12 at 9:33
    
Ok I got your point ! I hope some C# guru will give us an answer, I'm really curious about this... –  Julien Mar 2 '12 at 9:38
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your Selector-class implements the ITransform interface which means you'll have to include code to handle Transform(ISelection). Your class can also handle Transform(IValue) but only though inherited methods from the Editor class.

The reason to why it picks the ISelection variant is because that is the variant that is explicitly declared in your Selector class. To pick Transform(IValue) the compiler would have to make an assumption that you rather handle the call from your base class (Editor).

Edit: Some background from C# spec.

Each of these contexts defines the set of candidate function members and the list of arguments in its own unique way, as described in detail in the sections listed above. For example, the set of candidates for a method invocation does not include methods marked override (§7.4), and methods in a base class are not candidates if any method in a derived class is applicable (§7.6.5.1).

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Ok, I see, that answers my question and the fact that ITransform<IValue> is not even called if I override it in Selector. STRANGE ANYWAY. Thank you maka. –  Stephan Mar 2 '12 at 10:27
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On Q1 I think its because the compiler will look for the shorter hierarchy chain to get a valid overload. To get the ITransform on S1 you would have to go further.

s1->Selector->ISelector->ITransform<Selector>
s1->Selector->Editor->IEditor->ITransform<IValue>
s1->Selector->ISelector->IEditor->ITransform<IValue>

I'll look for a source to verify.

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1  
Hmmm, I thought about the same. But does this really make sense? That would break my opinion that "in method overloading the compiler ALWAYS resolves to the overload with the most specific type". Would be great to see some sources which verify this. Thanks in advance. –  Stephan Mar 2 '12 at 9:09
    
I got it now, I'll post in different answer. –  maka Mar 2 '12 at 9:55
    
I feel silly for this answer:( –  maka Mar 2 '12 at 10:17
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Question 1: Why does s1.Transform(v) resolve to ITransform<ISelection> and not to ITransform<IValue> as in the second case?

For me this resolves to Selector.Transform<ISelection>. As well it should: you said it was a Selector, and Selector has a public method named Transform, and it takes an ISelection. IValue extends ISelection. When would it get coerced into an ITransform? I don't believe this illustrates any contravariance, I think it is implicit conversion.

Question 2: For Question 1 it seems to make no difference if ITransform is in or invariant

since you use the generic parameter as a method arg not a return type, the rules state that the parameter must be contravariantly valid, which would allow the in, and disallow out.

public class Example
    {

        public interface ITransform<D> // or <in D> --> seems to make no difference here
        {
            void Transform(D data); //contravariant in ITranform<out D>.
            //D Transform(string input);  //covariance ok
        }

        public interface ISelection { }

        public interface IValue : ISelection { }

        public interface IEditor : ITransform<IValue> { }
        public interface ISelector : IEditor, ITransform<ISelection>
        {
            new void Transform(ISelection data);
        }

        class Value : IValue { }
        class Editor : IEditor
        {
            public void Transform(IValue data)
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        } 
        class Foo : Editor, ISelector
        {
            public void Transform(ISelection data)
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException();
            }
        }  

        public void Whatever()
        {
            Value v = new Value();
            Foo s1 = new Foo();
            IEditor s2 = s1;

            s1.Transform(v); // resolves to Foo.Tranform(ISelection)
            s2.Transform(v); // resolves to ITransform<IValue>     --> cast into IEditor, which sig says ITransform<IValue>

        }

      }
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Hi sweaver, to be honest, I am not sure what you want to tell me. However, your code gave me the idea to do the following in Selector: public new void Transform(IValue value) { base.Transform(value); }. Now, when accessing Selector directly and not through ISelector the "correct" code is called (why? see maka's answer). Thank you! –  Stephan Mar 2 '12 at 11:38
    
I was just saying I couldn't replicate "//resolves to ITransform<ISelection>" - the s1 object is a Selector and is never at any point an ITransform. –  sweaver2112 Mar 2 '12 at 11:48
    
Yes, right. But still I was expecting that Selector.Transform(value) resolves to ITransform<Value> and not ITransform<Selection> (both implemented by Selector) because Value is more specific than Selection. However, this turned out to be a wrong assumption as stated in C# spec (see maka's answer). Thanks anyway. –  Stephan Mar 2 '12 at 12:40
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