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So, I do:

$ ulimit -s
8192

Great. As I understand this, the stack segment of any process cannot exceed 8192 kilobytes.

Now, to challenge that..

#include <stdio.h>

void over_8k(void) {
    char buf[1024*1024*20];
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    printf("Starting .. ");
    over_8k();
    printf(" finishing.\nHow did this work?\n");
    return 0;
}

Compiled. Ran. No problems. Well this isn't right? over_8k alone should have a stack frame of, well, over 20 megabytes. Well, let's try accessing those 20 million bytes:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void over_8k(void) {
    char buf[1024*1024*20];
    memset(buf, 'A', sizeof(buf));
}

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    printf("Starting .. ");
    over_8k();
    printf(" finishing.\nHow did this work?\n");
    return 0;
}

.. drum roll ..

Segmentation fault: 11

Great. But that's not the error I'd expect? Invalid memory access?

Why does it raise a segfault, and doesn't error out earlier? On call to over_8k perhaps? How does this work? I want to know everything.

share|improve this question
6  
My guess: Stack allocation is often just an increment/decrement to the stack pointer. That itself won't segfault. It's only when you try to access the the data does it go into unmapped memory and crash. – Mysticial Mar 2 '12 at 9:09
1  
@Mysticial: damn right. It's easy to see when compiler provides assembly code. – maverik Mar 2 '12 at 9:14
    
What compiler and flags are you using to compile and test the above code? – Matt Mar 2 '12 at 9:40
    
Compiler claims to be i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-gcc-4.2 (GCC) 4.2.1. No option flags used (explicitly), apart from the usual -ggdb. – ntl0ve Mar 2 '12 at 9:58
1  
No optimizations. That would explain it. Then my comment (and the 2nd part of my answer) is the answer to your question. – Mysticial Mar 2 '12 at 10:11
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Expanding on my comment...

There's two possibilities I can think of:

The compiler is optimizing out the entire buf array:

In MSVC, with optimizations enabled, the entire array is being completely optimized out and is not allocated at all. So it's not using any stack.

Stack allocation is just an increment/decrement to the stack pointer:

sub rsp, 20971520

won't segfault. It's just a pointer. It will only segfault when you try to access it into unmapped memory.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for guess#1: "The compiler is optimizing out the entire buf array" – ArjunShankar Mar 2 '12 at 9:21
    
Guess #1 Doesn't explain the segmentation fault in the second version of the code though, as buf is being used, so shouldn't be optimised out, OR since buf is not read from, both the allocation and memset statement should be optimized out, so there should be no fault. Of course looking at the assembly would quickly verify that. – Matt Mar 2 '12 at 9:25
    
I tested in MSVC and the assembly shows it's still being optimized out. Apparently it's able to recognize the entire memset() as dead code and thus take it all out. Perhaps GCC is different, or the default optimization level is too high. – Mysticial Mar 2 '12 at 9:26
    
@Mysticial, So then why the segmentation fault? If they are both taken out (which I agree they should be) then the OP should not be seeing a fault. Incidently, did you get the same error when you ran the code with MSVC? – Matt Mar 2 '12 at 9:34
    
@Mat Neither case is segfaulting on MSVC. I look at assembly and they are identical. The over_8k() function is effectively a no-op and the stack pointer is not being decremented at all. – Mysticial Mar 2 '12 at 9:36

Declaring your buf array involves nothing more than incrementing the stack pointer.

Incrementing the stack pointer itself beyond the limit of the stack area is not going to make the program crash - it's just a register that happens to have a larger value. Referring to memory beyond that area, however, will most certainly make the program crash.

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I would recommend to make the following replacements: incrementing --> decrementing, beyond the limit --> outside, larger --> smaller, (the last) beyond --> below/outside. – Atom Mar 2 '12 at 12:57
    
True, the stack grows downward on most platforms but the principle is the same. – Blagovest Buyukliev Mar 2 '12 at 13:05

The stack on most operating systems is demand-allocated.

This means that the stack isn't created at its full size upfront - instead, it's automatically extended the first time that you touch each page beyond the current end of the stack.

So in this case, the access caused by the memset() tries to allocate 20M of stack, and this fails due to the stack size limit. When a failure to allocate memory to satisfy a page fault occurs, there's not a lot of options for error reporting - all that can really be done on a UNIX-like system is to send the process a signal. In your case, this is SIGSEGV.

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Why does it raise a segfault?

The program is accessing memory location that wasn't allocated from the OS. The memory location does not belong to the heap nor does it belong to the stack. The error message cannot be more detailed than Segmentation fault: 11 because the memory location does not belong to anything.

Why doesn't it error out earlier? Why doesn't it error out on call to over_8k?

C is an unsafe language with emphasis on program performance. Checking the stack at the start of each function would slow down all C programs.

How does this work?

In C, all variables (that aren't explicitly initialized) are uninitialized when they are created. The following line of code:

char buf[1024*1024*20];

allocates buf on the stack, but it does not touch the allocated memory.

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If you are using GCC, you may want to look at using the -fstack-check, you can see some of the options for it on this page.

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