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Can I use my table valued function in order by clause of my select query????

Like this :

declare @ID int
set @ID=9011
Exec ('select top 10 * from cs_posts order by ' + (select * from dbo.gettopposter(@ID)) desc)

GetTopPoster(ID) is my table valued function.

Please help me on this.

share|improve this question
    
You are trying to concatenate the result of a select to a string? How is that supposed to work? – Oded Mar 2 '12 at 10:04
    
have you tried your code? if yes any errors you are getting. – mr_eclair Mar 2 '12 at 10:04
    
if select * returns more than one result, It won't work. – mr_eclair Mar 2 '12 at 10:05
    
Rakesh, could you describe the objective of your query? – Phil Helmer Mar 2 '12 at 10:07
    
I am getting this error 'Incorrect syntax near 'GetTopPoster'. – rr_only4you Mar 2 '12 at 10:18

You can use a table-valued function with a join. That also allows you to choose any combination of columns to sort by:

select  top 10 * 
from    cs_posts p
join    dbo.gettopposter(@ID) as gtp
on      p.poster_id = gtp.poster_id
order by
        gtp.col1
,       gtp.col2
share|improve this answer

Yes. You can use a Table Valued Function just as a normal table.

Your query is not valid SQL though, despite the TVF.

For further reference:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms191165.aspx

share|improve this answer

You can't do it like that - how does it know what to order by? It doesn't know how the TVF relates to the original query. You can join the two however (as I assume cs_posts has an id column which relates to the TVF) and then order by the the TVF id column.

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