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I'm in the process of learning Scala for a new project having come from Rails. I've defined a type that is going to be used in a number of my models which can basically be thought of as collection of 'attributes'. It's basically just a wrapper for a hashmap that delegates most of its responsibilities to it:

case class Description(attributes: Map[String, String]) {

  override def hashCode: Int = attributes.hashCode

  override def equals(other: Any) = other match {
    case that: Description => this.attributes == that.attributes
    case _ => false
  }
}

So I would then define a model class with a Description, something like:

case class Person(val name: String, val description: Description)

However, when I persist a Person with a SalatDAO I end up with a document that looks like this:

{
  name : "Russell",
  description: 
  {
    attributes: 
    {
      hair: "brown",
      favourite_color: "blue"
    }
  }
}

When in actual fact I don't need the nesting of the attributes tag in the description tag - what I actually want is this:

{
  name : "Russell",
  description: 
  {
    hair: "brown",
    favourite_color: "blue"
  }
}

I haven't tried, but I reckon I could get that to work if I made Description extend a Map rather than contain one, but I'd rather not, because a Description isn't a type of Map, it's something which has some of the behaviour of a Map as well as other behaviour of its own I'm going to add later. Composition over inheritance and so on.

So my question is, how can I tell Salat (or Casbah, I'm actually a bit unclear as to which is doing the conversion as I've only just started using them) how to serialize and deserialize the Description class? In the casbah tutorial here it says:

It is also possible to create your own custom type serializers and deserializers. See Custom Serializers and Deserializers.

But this page doesn't seem to exist. Or am I going about it the wrong way? Is there actually a really simple way to indicate this is what I want to happen, an annotation or something? Or can I simply delegate the serialization to the attributes map in some way?

EDIT: After having a look at the source for the JodaTime conversion helper I've tried the following but have had no luck getting it to work yet:

import org.bson.{ BSON, Transformer }
import com.mongodb.casbah.commons.conversions.MongoConversionHelper

object RegisterCustomConversionHelpers extends Serializers
  with Deserializers {
  def apply() = {
    super.register()
  }
}

trait Serializers extends MongoConversionHelper
  with DescriptionSerializer {

  override def register() = {
    super.register()
  }
  override def unregister() = {
    super.unregister()
  }
}

trait Deserializers extends MongoConversionHelper {
  override def register() = {
    super.register()
  }
  override def unregister() = {
    super.unregister()
  }
}

trait DescriptionSerializer extends MongoConversionHelper {
  private val transformer = new Transformer {
    def transform(o: AnyRef): AnyRef = o match {
      case d: Description => d.attributes.asInstanceOf[AnyRef]
      case _ => o
    }
  }

  override def register() = {
    BSON.addEncodingHook(classOf[Description], transformer)
    super.register()
  }
}

When I call RegisterCustomConversionHelpers() then save a Person I don't get any errors, it just has no effect, saving the document the same way as ever. This also seems like quite a lot to have to do for what I want.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Salat maintainer here.

I don't understand the value of Description as a wrapper here. It wraps a map of attributes, overrides the default equals and hashcode impl of a case class - which seems unnecessary since the impl is delegated to the map anyhow and that is exactly what the case class does anyway - and introduces an additional layer of indirection to the serialized object.

Have you considered just:

case class Person(val name: String, val description: Map[String, String])

This will do exactly what you want out of box.

In another situation I would recommend a simple type alias but unfortunately Salat can't support type aliases right now due to some issues with how they are depicted in pickled Scala signatures.

(You probably omitted this from your example from brevity, but it is best practice for your Mongo model to have an _id field - if you don't, the Mongo Java driver will supply one for you)

There is a working example of a custom BSON hook in the salat-core test package (it handles java.net.URL). It could be that your hook is not working simply because you are not registering it in the right place? But still, I would recommend getting rid of Description unless it is adding some value that is not evident from your example above.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi @prasinous, thanks for your answer (and thanks for your work on Salat!). The reason I have created a separate class for Description is that I intend to add behaviour to it. I may also be adding to or changing its composition in future. –  Russell Mar 2 '12 at 13:39
    
(and yes, _id omitted for brevity) –  Russell Mar 2 '12 at 13:41
    
Given what you've said and that looking at the test code suggests it may be hard to identify which particular maps need to be deserialized into Description objects, I've decided to change my design a bit and posted it in the answer below. Thanks again. –  Russell Mar 2 '12 at 17:05

Based on @prasinous' answer I decided this wasn't going to be that easy so I've changed my design a bit to the following, which pretty much gets me what I want. Rather than persisting the Description as a field I persist a vanilla map then mix in a Described trait to the model classes I want to have a description, which automatically converts the map to Description when the object is created. Would appreciate it if anyone can point out any obvious problems to this approach or any suggestions for improvement.

class Description(val attributes: Map[String, String]){
  //rest of class omitted
}

trait Described {
  val attributes: Map[String, String]
  val description = new Description(attributes)
}

case class Person(name: String, attributes: Map[String, String]) extends Described
share|improve this answer
    
I was going to suggest "case class Person(name: String, @Key("description") private val attributes: Map[String, String]) { lazy val description = Description(attributes) }" –  prasinous Mar 2 '12 at 23:21
    
Yes, that's a bit simpler. I'm not sure as yet if I'm going to need to treat different Described objects in a homogenous way. If not I'll take that approach. Thanks again. –  Russell Mar 3 '12 at 10:18

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