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I was thinking about the classic issue of lazy singleton initialization - the whole matter of the inefficiency of:

if (instance == null)
{
    instance = new Foo();
}
return instance;

Anyone who knows what a Singleton is is familiar with the issue(you only need the if once). It's trivial but irritating.

So, I thought of an alternate solution, at least for .NET(although it should work anywhere that has some equivalent to function pointers:

public class Foo
{
    private delegate Foo FooReturner();

    private static Foo innerFoo;

    private static FooReturner fooReturnHandler = new FooReturner(InitialFooReturner);

    public static Foo Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return fooReturnHandler();
        }
    }
    private static Foo InitialFooReturner()
    {
        innerFoo = new Foo();
        fooReturnHandler = new FooReturner(NewFooReturner); 
        return innerFoo;
    }

    private static Foo NewFooReturner()
    {
        return innerFoo;
    }

}

In short - the Instance returns a delegate method. The delegate is initially set to a method that initializes your instance, then changes the delegate to point at a simple Return method.

Now, I like to think I'm not terrible at my job, but I have no pretensions about being awesome. I have not seen an example of this code anywhere.

Ergo, I come to the conclusion that I am missing something. Something major. Either that the whole problem is too trivial to bother thinking that much about or this does something horrible that will destroy the universe. Or I fail at searching and therefore haven't seen the hundreds of developers using this method. Something, anyway.

I was hoping the good folks here at Stack Overflow could clue me in as to what(leaving aside the controversy on whether one should use a Singleton at all).

EDIT for clarification:

This is not performance code(although if the design actively degrades performance beyond the traditional model, that would be interesting to know).

It was written purely as proof-of-concept, and I am further aware that it is not thread-safe as it properly should be. Is there any reason why it could NOT be made thread-safe by it's very nature?

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"inefficiency" - I'd worry more that it isn't actually thread-safe ;-p –  Marc Gravell Jun 4 '09 at 21:49
    
Re the edit... but it adds complexity, and doesn't address any issue... why would you choose this over just a null check? If you want to fix the thread safety, read Jon's page... –  Marc Gravell Jun 4 '09 at 22:17
    
+1 "Universe destruction" hypothesis. :P Apart from that, good question, and faved for the record. –  MrZombie Jun 5 '09 at 15:58
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6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

This is the canonical, thread safe, lazy Singleton pattern in C#:

public sealed class Singleton
{
    Singleton(){}
    public static Singleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return Nested.instance;
        }
    }        
    class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested() {}    
        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }
}
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5  
And for Java programmers, the equivalent is called the "Lazy Initialization Holder Class" idiom, described in Item 71 of Effective Java 2nd ed. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Jun 4 '09 at 21:44
    
That my be lazy to the MySingleton type, but it isn't necessarily granular to the .Instance property –  Marc Gravell Jun 4 '09 at 21:45
    
See Jon's article referenced in Marc's answer; the "canonical" pattern may not be as lazy as we would like it to be. –  AnthonyWJones Jun 4 '09 at 21:48
    
We had linked the same article, but my short simplification was ill-advised. Ultimately, I have edited to duplicate Marc's answer. He should be given the accepted answer. –  Randolpho Jun 4 '09 at 21:52
    
Nah - I'll delete mine; you can have it ;-p –  Marc Gravell Jun 4 '09 at 21:54
show 4 more comments

To prevent from having to copy the singleton code, you could make the type generic, as such:

public abstract class Singleton<T>
    where T: class, new()
{
    public static T Instance
    {
        get { return Nested.instance; }
    }

    private class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested() { }

        internal static readonly T instance = new T();
    }
}

public sealed class MyType : Singleton<MyType>
{
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        // two usage pattterns are possible:
        Console.WriteLine(
            ReferenceEquals(
                Singleton<MyType>.Instance, 
                MyType.Instance
            )
        );
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This abstract generic solution has a flaw. It relies on derived type publicly exposing a constructor, which in turn would allow anybody to use it. Typically ctor() has to be made private in order to force client's usage of MyType.Instance property. Imho copy-pasting implementation is a small price to pay in this case. –  Sherlock Dec 14 '10 at 20:13
    
I wouldn't call it a flaw, it is a design choice. –  oɔɯǝɹ Jan 8 '11 at 17:46
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Have you measured the performance?

Do you believe that an additional function call is cheaper than an if?

I agree with the others that using the static ctor works well for this initialization. This will also get rid of the inherent race condition that the you have since .net guarentees that static constructors will only be called once.

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I agree, a null check is definitely faster than a method call... –  Thomas Levesque Jun 4 '09 at 21:57
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the whole matter of the inefficiency of:...

What inefficiency?

Those instructions will result into an extremely fast fragments of assembly code. I am completely sure that there is nothing to be gained by trying to "optimize" this. Even if you come up with something faster, it will be at a significant complexity cost.

Unless you do have positive evidence that this code is affecting your performance, you should use the simplest approach that solves your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
while simple, the null-check approach isn't actually thread-safe... –  Marc Gravell Jun 4 '09 at 21:50
    
That said, the approach you are displaying, is conceptually a well-known pattern in use for many years for JIT (Just-In-Time) compilation, including .NET's "IL" itself: When a function call is found, it is made to "point" to a compiler call for the source of the function. The first time it's called, what runs is the compiler, which compiles the fragment into machine code and replaces the reference to point to the newly compiled code. Finally, the new code is called and the compiled gets out of the way. JIT is a furiously performance-critical scenario that justifies this kind of complexity. –  Euro Micelli Jun 4 '09 at 21:53
    
@Mark Gravell: > while simple, the null-check approach isn't actually thread-safe... < -- Correct. If the singleton will be called from multiple threads, you should use the Double-checked locking pattern, which is actually guaranteed to work in .NET –  Euro Micelli Jun 4 '09 at 22:02
    
I wasn't actually aiming for a performance gain - this was purely done on a whim, since I feel it adds a bit of elegance. What puzzles me, as I said, is why I haven't seen it before. Surely I can't be the first to have thought of it? –  Faqa Jun 4 '09 at 22:05
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I have just started to program in c# (coming from C++ its a breath of fresh air) and this is what I use to implement singleton patterns.

public sealed class MyClass
{    
    #region make singleton

    static readonly Lazy<MyClass> _singleton =
        new Lazy<MyClass>(() => new MyClass());

    public static MyClass Singleton
    {
        get { return _singleton.Value; }
    }

    private MyClass() { Initialize() };

    #endregion

    Initialize() { /*TODO*/ };
}
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I always use this regular (non-lazy) one (you could nest it like the other examples): (requires using System.Reflection;)

public class SingletonBase<T> where T : class
{
    static SingletonBase()
    {
    }

    public static readonly T Instance = 
        typeof(T).InvokeMember(typeof(T).Name, 
                                BindingFlags.CreateInstance | 
                                BindingFlags.Instance |
                                BindingFlags.Public |
                                BindingFlags.NonPublic, 
                                null, null, null) as T;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I would add the new() constraint to type parameter T. Otherwise this will result in runtime errors. –  oɔɯǝɹ Jun 4 '09 at 22:47
    
I don't allow my singletons to have a public constructor. –  Cade Roux Jun 4 '09 at 23:32
    
Can you post this on stackoverflow.com/questions/100081/… its the closest to a correct answer I have seen. –  Sam Saffron Jun 18 '09 at 1:08
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