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I have a form with multiple inputs / radio buttons.

I also have a series of Yes & No radio buttons. When the "Yes" radio button is checked, I have some data slide down beneath.

HTML:

        <div class="item seperator first clearfix">
            <label>test</label>
            <div class="radioWrap">
                <label class="yes">
                <input class="homepageContent" name="homepageContent" type="radio" value="yes" />
                </label>
                <label class="no">
                <input class="homepageContent" name="homepageContent" type="radio" value="no" checked />
                </label>
            </div>
        </div>
        <div class="extrasInner">
            <div class="item clearfix">
                <label for="theContent">Your Content:</label>
                <textarea id="theContent" name="theContent"></textarea>
            </div>  
        </div>  
        <div class="extrasOuter hide clearfix">         
            <a href="#" class="makeChanges">Make Changes</a>
            <span>Click "Make Changes" to update.</span>
        </div>  

The jQuery:

$("input:radio[name=homepageContent], input:radio[name=addSocialIcons], input:radio[name=addTracking]").click(function() {
    var value = $(this).val();
    if (value == 'yes') {
        $(this).parent().parent().parent().next().slideDown();          
        $(this).parent().parent().parent().next().next().slideDown();
    } else {
        $(this).parent().parent().parent().next().slideUp();
        $(this).parent().parent().parent().next().next().slideUp();
    }
});

Question 1) This works absolutely fine in Google Chrome, but not in Firefox and IE. It doesn't seem to recognise the click function?

Solved: I had a function within one of my files that removes the value from input fields on focus and this was stripping the value of the radio buttons as well in IE / Firefox (but not chrome!).

Question 2) Is my DOM traversing for the slideUp / slideDown an acceptable way of achieving what I'm trying to do? Are there any disadvantages to how I'm doing it and can it be improved?

share|improve this question
2  
The major disadvantage to your current DOM traversal is that you'll need to change it if you change the structure of your HTML. If, for whatever reason, you add another element between the outer <div> and the <input> then you'll need to remember to add another call to .parent(). Using .closest() with an appropriate selector would be better, since it will traverse up the DOM tree until it finds the first element that matches. –  Anthony Grist Mar 2 '12 at 12:16
1  
I've just tried it, and it works (seemingly) from the second click and on :) (IE9/FF 10) –  dezso Mar 2 '12 at 12:17
1  
Works for me - jsFiddle. First click on 'yes' doesn't work because the element is already visible. –  Anthony Grist Mar 2 '12 at 12:20
    
How odd. That works fine for me as well. Perhaps something else in my site is causing it to stop working. I'll do some digging. –  tctc91 Mar 2 '12 at 12:23
    
Ah, I've found out why it's not working. For some reason, the value of the radio buttons are being removed upon click meaning the test if = yes - is causing it to not work. –  tctc91 Mar 2 '12 at 12:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Answer to #1

As Anthony Grist pointed out, there doesn't seem to be an issue with the click function.

Answer to #2

Your DOM traversal seem a bit unnecessary. In fact, your DOM structure is in need of rearrangement.

  • Using a checkbox instead of radio buttons. A checkbox only accepts two values: true or false, or in your case, yes or no. It seems more suitable.
  • Encapsulate your extras inner and extras outer divs inside your item div instead of having it next to the checkbox. This way, you make it easier to traverse within the item.

Also, you should read up on the different types of traverse functions JQuery has:

Knowing all of these traverse functions, you'll most likely never ever do parent().parent().parent()... again. :)

Here's a JSFiddle example | Code

HTML

<ul>
    <li class='item'>
        <label>
            <input class="homepageContent" name="homepageContent" type="checkbox" value="yes" />
            Item 1
        </label>
        <div class='extras'>
            <div class='inner'>
                <label>
                    Your Content:<textarea name="content"></textarea>
                </label>
            </div>
            <div class='outer'>
                <a href="#" class="makeChanges">Make Changes</a>
                <span>Click "Make Changes" to update.</span>
            </div>
        </div>
    </li>
</ul>

Javascript

$("input:checkbox").click(function() {
    var $this = $(this),
        $item = $(this).closest(".item");

    if($this.is(':checked')){
        $(".extras", $item).slideDown();
    }else{
        $(".extras", $item).slideUp();
    }
});

CSS

.extras{
    display: none;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've already solved the main issue of the radio buttons not working (answer in op) but I gave you the answer based upon your excellent answer to point #2. Thanks :) –  tctc91 Mar 2 '12 at 13:14
    
@tctc91 Glad I could help. :) –  ShadowScripter Mar 2 '12 at 13:35

Value of the radio button will always be same, no matter it is checked or not. If you want to know the particular radio button is checked or not then use this code. Based on the status of the radio button do your stuff.

var value = $(this).attr('checked')
share|improve this answer
1  
Are you sure? My script returns the value of the radio buttons (yes or no) absolutely fine? –  tctc91 Mar 2 '12 at 12:32

That is working for me in FF (jsfiddle), although the DOM looks a little convoluted (I'm guessing because it's missing a lot of your other CSS/resources).

I think you can simplify the jQuery selectors a lot. Generally, using simple ID or class selectors will make the your page much more performant (and simpler!)

$('.homepageContent').click(function() {
    var value = $(this).val();
    if (value == 'yes') {
        $('.extrasInner').slideDown();          
        $('.extrasOuter').slideDown();
    } else {
        $('.extrasInner').slideUp();
        $('.extrasOuter').slideUp();
    }
});

Hopefully doing something like this makes it work cross browser better too.

share|improve this answer
    
I have multiple extrasInner/Outer classes and radio buttons within my page which is why I did it by traversing the dom using (this) instead of writing out a click function for each one with different ID's. –  tctc91 Mar 2 '12 at 12:30

try this way

$("input:radio[name=homepageContent], input:radio[name=addSocialIcons], input:radio[name=addTracking]").click(function() {
    var value = $(this).val();
    if (value == 'yes') {
        $(this).parents('.seperator').next().slideDown();          
        $(this).parents('.seperator').next().next().slideDown();
    } else {
        $(this).parents('.seperator').next().slideUp();
        $(this).parents('.seperator').next().next().slideUp();
    }
});

EDIT

and also a point

wrap your code inside

$(document).ready(function(){});

like this

$(document).ready(function(){

    $("input:radio[name=homepageContent], input:radio[name=addSocialIcons], input:radio[name=addTracking]").click(function() {
        var value = $(this).val();
        if (value == 'yes') {
            $(this).parents('.seperator').next().slideDown();          
            $(this).parents('.seperator').next().next().slideDown();
        } else {
            $(this).parents('.seperator').next().slideUp();
            $(this).parents('.seperator').next().next().slideUp();
        }
    });


});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's helped shorten the DOM traversal a little bit but not solved my firefox / ie issue I'm afraid. It should work fine (it does on jsfiddle) so I'm guessing it's a problem caused by my site instead. And yes, my code is already in a document ready function :) –  tctc91 Mar 2 '12 at 12:35
    
did you wrapped code inside $(document).ready(function(){}) –  Kanishka Panamaldeniya Mar 2 '12 at 12:37
2  
@KanishkaPanamaldeniya Actually, wrapping input inside the label is valid html. It is allowed to do it both ways. You can do either <label for="element">Item</label><input id="element" name="name" /> or <label>Item<input id="element" name="name" /></label> –  ShadowScripter Mar 2 '12 at 13:11
    
oh sory , i will edit this –  Kanishka Panamaldeniya Mar 2 '12 at 13:19

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