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void a() { ... }
void b() { ... }

struct X
{
    X() { b(); }
};

void f()
{
    a();
    static X x;
    ...
}

Assume f is called multiple times from various threads (potentially contended) after the entry of main. (and of course that the only calls to a and b are those seen above)

When the above code is compiled with gcc g++ 4.6 in -std=gnu++0x mode:

Q1. Is it guaranteed that a() will be called at least once and return before b() is called? That is to ask, on the first call to f(), is the constructor of x called at the same time an automatic duration local variable (non-static) would be (and not at global static initialization time for example)?

Q2. Is it guaranteed that b() will be called exactly once? Even if two threads execute f for the first time at the same time on different cores? If yes, by which specific mechanism does the GCC generated code provide synchronization? Edit: Additionally could one of the threads calling f() obtain access to x before the constructor of X returns?

Update: I am trying to compile an example and decompile to investigate mechanism...

test.cpp:

struct X;

void ext1(int x);
void ext2(X& x);

void a() { ext1(1); }
void b() { ext1(2); }

struct X
{
    X() { b(); }
};

void f()
{
    a();
    static X x;
    ext2(x);
}

Then:

$ g++ -std=gnu++0x -c -o test.o ./test.cpp
$ objdump -d test.o -M intel > test.dump

test.dump:

test.o:     file format elf64-x86-64


Disassembly of section .text:

0000000000000000 <_Z1av>:
   0:   55                      push   rbp
   1:   48 89 e5                mov    rbp,rsp
   4:   bf 01 00 00 00          mov    edi,0x1
   9:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   e <_Z1av+0xe>
   e:   5d                      pop    rbp
   f:   c3                      ret    

0000000000000010 <_Z1bv>:
  10:   55                      push   rbp
  11:   48 89 e5                mov    rbp,rsp
  14:   bf 02 00 00 00          mov    edi,0x2
  19:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   1e <_Z1bv+0xe>
  1e:   5d                      pop    rbp
  1f:   c3                      ret    

0000000000000020 <_Z1fv>:
  20:   55                      push   rbp
  21:   48 89 e5                mov    rbp,rsp
  24:   41 54                   push   r12
  26:   53                      push   rbx
  27:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   2c <_Z1fv+0xc>
  2c:   b8 00 00 00 00          mov    eax,0x0
  31:   0f b6 00                movzx  eax,BYTE PTR [rax]
  34:   84 c0                   test   al,al
  36:   75 2d                   jne    65 <_Z1fv+0x45>
  38:   bf 00 00 00 00          mov    edi,0x0
  3d:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   42 <_Z1fv+0x22>
  42:   85 c0                   test   eax,eax
  44:   0f 95 c0                setne  al
  47:   84 c0                   test   al,al
  49:   74 1a                   je     65 <_Z1fv+0x45>
  4b:   41 bc 00 00 00 00       mov    r12d,0x0
  51:   bf 00 00 00 00          mov    edi,0x0
  56:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   5b <_Z1fv+0x3b>
  5b:   bf 00 00 00 00          mov    edi,0x0
  60:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   65 <_Z1fv+0x45>
  65:   bf 00 00 00 00          mov    edi,0x0
  6a:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   6f <_Z1fv+0x4f>
  6f:   5b                      pop    rbx
  70:   41 5c                   pop    r12
  72:   5d                      pop    rbp
  73:   c3                      ret    
  74:   48 89 c3                mov    rbx,rax
  77:   45 84 e4                test   r12b,r12b
  7a:   75 0a                   jne    86 <_Z1fv+0x66>
  7c:   bf 00 00 00 00          mov    edi,0x0
  81:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   86 <_Z1fv+0x66>
  86:   48 89 d8                mov    rax,rbx
  89:   48 89 c7                mov    rdi,rax
  8c:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   91 <_Z1fv+0x71>

Disassembly of section .text._ZN1XC2Ev:

0000000000000000 <_ZN1XC1Ev>:
   0:   55                      push   rbp
   1:   48 89 e5                mov    rbp,rsp
   4:   48 83 ec 10             sub    rsp,0x10
   8:   48 89 7d f8             mov    QWORD PTR [rbp-0x8],rdi
   c:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   11 <_ZN1XC1Ev+0x11>
  11:   c9                      leave  
  12:   c3                      ret    

I don't see the synchronization mechanism? Or is it added at linktime?

Update2: Ok when I link it I can see it...

400973: 84 c0                   test   %al,%al
400975: 75 2d                   jne    4009a4 <_Z1fv+0x45>
400977: bf 98 20 40 00          mov    $0x402098,%edi
40097c: e8 1f fe ff ff          callq  4007a0 <__cxa_guard_acquire@plt>
400981: 85 c0                   test   %eax,%eax
400983: 0f 95 c0                setne  %al
400986: 84 c0                   test   %al,%al
400988: 74 1a                   je     4009a4 <_Z1fv+0x45>
40098a: 41 bc 00 00 00 00       mov    $0x0,%r12d
400990: bf a0 20 40 00          mov    $0x4020a0,%edi
400995: e8 a6 00 00 00          callq  400a40 <_ZN1XC1Ev>
40099a: bf 98 20 40 00          mov    $0x402098,%edi
40099f: e8 0c fe ff ff          callq  4007b0 <__cxa_guard_release@plt>
4009a4: bf a0 20 40 00          mov    $0x4020a0,%edi
4009a9: e8 72 ff ff ff          callq  400920 <_Z4ext2R1X>
4009ae: 5b                      pop    %rbx
4009af: 41 5c                   pop    %r12
4009b1: 5d                      pop    %rbp

It surrounds it with __cxa_guard_acquire and __cxa_guard_release, whatever they do.

share|improve this question
    
Q2 : guaranteed exactly once. C++11 knows about threads and that was specified in the standard. As for the mecanism, no idea, but it can't be very different from a mutex ;). –  J.N. Mar 2 '12 at 12:58
    
Q2: guaranteed (as others already indicated). Q1: I wouldn't bet on it. Declaring a static variable is hardly part of the program flow and optimizers are notorious code-shufflers. Anyway, I would hate to maintain code that depends on subtleties like this. –  stefaanv Mar 2 '12 at 13:29
    
@stefaanv: Incorrect. Order is guaranteed by both standard and implementation. –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 2 '12 at 14:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Q1. Yes. According to C++11, 6.7/4:

such a variable is initialized the first time control passes through its declaration

so it will be initialised after the first call to a().

Q2. Under GCC, and any compiler that supports the C++11 thread model: yes, initialisation of local static variables is thread safe. Other compilers might not give that guarantee. The exact mechanism is an implementation detail. I believe GCC uses an atomic flag to indicate whether it's initialised, and a mutex to protect initialisation when the flag is not set, but I could be wrong. Certainly, this thread implies that it was originally implemented like that.

UPDATE: your code does indeed contain the initialisation code. You can see it more clearly if you link it, and then disassemble the program, so that you can see which functions are being called. I also used objdump -SC to interleave the source and demangle C++ names. It uses internal locking functions __cxa_guard_acquire and __cxa_guard_release, to make sure only one thread executes the initialisation code.

  #void f()
  #{
  400724: push   rbp
  400725: mov    rbp,rsp
  400728: push   r13
  40072a: push   r12
  40072c: push   rbx
  40072d: sub    rsp,0x8

  # a();
  400731: call   400704 <a()>

  # static X x;
  # if (!guard) {
  400736: mov    eax,0x601050
  40073b: movzx  eax,BYTE PTR [rax]
  40073e: test   al,al
  400740: jne    400792 <f()+0x6e>

  #     if (__cxa_guard_acquire(&guard)) {
  400742: mov    edi,0x601050
  400747: call   4005c0 <__cxa_guard_acquire@plt>  
  40074c: test   eax,eax
  40074e: setne  al
  400751: test   al,al
  400753: je     400792 <f()+0x6e>

  #         // initialise x
  400755: mov    ebx,0x0
  40075a: mov    edi,0x601058
  40075f: call   4007b2 <X::X()>

  #         __cxa_guard_release(&guard);
  400764: mov    edi,0x601050
  400769: call   4005e0 <__cxa_guard_release@plt>

  #     } else {
  40076e: jmp    400792 <f()+0x6e>

  #         // already initialised
  400770: mov    r12d,edx
  400773: mov    r13,rax
  400776: test   bl,bl
  400778: jne    400784 <f()+0x60>
  40077a: mov    edi,0x601050
  40077f: call   4005f0 <__cxa_guard_abort@plt>
  400784: mov    rax,r13
  400787: movsxd rdx,r12d
  40078a: mov    rdi,rax
  40078d: 400610 <_Unwind_Resume@plt>

  #     }
  # }
  # ext2(x);
  400792: mov    edi,0x601058
  400797: call   4007d1 <_Z4ext2R1X>
  #}
share|improve this answer
    
See my update... How can I see the sync mechanism? –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 2 '12 at 14:10

As far as I know it is guaranteed that b is only called once. However, it is not guaranteed that the initialisation is performed thread safe, which means another thread could potentially work with a half/not initialized x. (That's kind of funny because static mutexes are basicly useless this way.)

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is not the behaviour in C++11 enabled with the given command line parameter. It was correct in the older standard though. –  J.N. Mar 2 '12 at 13:35
    
C++11 requires thread-safe initialisation, and GCC has provided it by default for quite some time. –  Mike Seymour Mar 2 '12 at 13:43
    
This post could be improved by not being incorrect. –  Andrew Tomazos Mar 2 '12 at 14:27

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