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I have three files like this:

haeder
line

I write this:

sed '1,1d' */*filename*.txt | xarg cat > crap4.txt

and expect this:

line
line
line

but I get "cat: line: No such file or directory"...

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -s '1d' */*filename*.txt > crap4.txt

The -s switch treats each file separately rather than the default which is as one continuous stream.

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That's because sed is sending the contents of those edited files out. The first argument cat gets is the first line of the edited file.

You're making it too complicated, you want

sed '1,1d' */*filename*.txt > crap4.txt
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I get "header" from file 2 and 3 into crap4.txt. –  AWE Mar 2 '12 at 14:24

This is a useless use of cat (as defined by Randal Schwartz). Using plain redirection works. If you really wanted to use cat, you'd want to remove 'xargs' and use '-' as an argument to cat. Here's an example to print all of the names from /etc/hosts

myhost> awk '{print $NF}' /etc/hosts | cat -
localhost
myhost

hosts
ip6-loopback
ip6-localnet
ip6-mcastprefix
ip6-allnodes
ip6-allrouters
ip6-allhosts

But using '>' instead and getting rid of the 'cat' is probably your best choice here.

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"awk '{(getline); print $NF}' filename.txt | cat > crap.txt" worked –  AWE Mar 2 '12 at 14:35

This is what worked perfectly:

array=(*somestring*.txt)
for i in {0..2}; do
sed '1d' ${array[$i]} >> crap4.txt;
done

Bash to the rescue.

Thanx for the help.

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