Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a good why to extract the same information that uname does from a compressed kernel image? I want this to be able to check the dog tags of kernel sitting in dormant mtd's on an Embedded Linux system and compare it to the currently running kernel.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For Linux image compressed with gzip, use this:

dd if=arch/arm/boot/zImage bs=1 skip=$(LC_ALL=C grep -a -b -o $'\x1f\x8b\x08\x00\x00\x00\x00\x00' arch/arm/boot/zImage | cut -d ':' -f 1) | zcat | grep -a 'Linux version'

For Linux image compressed with xz, use this:

dd if=arch/arm/boot/zImage bs=1 skip=$(LC_ALL=C grep -a -b -o $'\xFD\x37\x7A\x58\x5A\x00' arch/arm/boot/zImage | head -n 1 | cut -d ':' -f 1) | xzcat | grep -a 'Linux version'

Because the image file contains data after the end of the compressed stream, you'll get an error you can ignore.

The string constant appears to be part of the frozen userspace visible kernel API:

http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git;a=blob;f=init/version.c;hb=HEAD#l40

share|improve this answer

$ mkimage -l uImage

Image Name:   Linux-2.6.39
Created:      Wed Jun  6 13:49:58 2012
Image Type:   ARM Linux Kernel Image (uncompressed)
Data Size:    3091036 Bytes = 3018.59 kB = 2.95 MB
Load Address: 80008000
Entry Point:  80008000
share|improve this answer
1  
works for zImage also –  chris varnz Mar 10 '14 at 14:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.