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How would I create a C macro to get the integer value of a string? The specific use-case is following on from a question here. I want to change code like this:

enum insn {
    sysenter = (uint64_t)'r' << 56 | (uint64_t)'e' << 48 |
               (uint64_t)'t' << 40 | (uint64_t)'n' << 32 |
               (uint64_t)'e' << 24 | (uint64_t)'s' << 16 |
               (uint64_t)'y' << 8  | (uint64_t)'s',
    mov = (uint64_t)'v' << 16 | (uint64_t)'o' << 8 |
          (uint64_t)'m'
};

To this:

enum insn {
    sysenter = INSN_TO_ENUM("sysenter"),
    mov      = INSN_TO_ENUM("mov")
};

Where INSN_TO_ENUM expands to the same code. The performance would be the same, but the readability would be boosted by a lot.

I'm suspecting that in this form it might not be possible because of a the C preprocessor's inability for string processing, so this would also be an unpreferred but acceptable solution (variable argument macro):

enum insn {
    sysenter = INSN_TO_ENUM('s','y','s','e','n','t','e','r'),
    mov      = INSN_TO_ENUM('m','o','v')
};
share|improve this question
    
At this point I would be writing my own pre-pre-processor. Trying to do it your way is just going to be revoltingly painful. It's a trivial script to write in your favourite scripting language. Assuming your enums are relatively static over time (i.e. you aren't editing them day in and day out) then I think that would be convenient and readable. –  David Heffernan Mar 2 '12 at 15:13
    
@DavidHeffernan: I have considered that, but as a last resort. If it could be done as a macro, we have the advantage of readability as well as being able to abstract/hide this particular implementation detail. IMO the advantages outweigh the option of generating via 'pre-pre-processing'. –  Mike Kwan Mar 2 '12 at 15:18
    
I'm not sure if it is possible for the macro to handle the variable arguments or it just accepts it to pass it around. See my answer for the 1 argument one. –  Shahbaz Mar 2 '12 at 15:24
    
@Mike Kwan: This is a weird way to use enums. Maybe you should just do enum insn { sysenter, mov }; and be happy with sequential numbering. What problem are you trying to solve? –  David Grayson Mar 2 '12 at 18:39
    
@DavidGrayson: The problem i am trying to solve is this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/9524342/… –  Mike Kwan Mar 2 '12 at 18:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a compile-time, pure C solution, which you indicated as acceptable. You may need to extend it for longer mnemonics. I'll keep on thinking about the desired one (i.e. INSN_TO_ENUM("sysenter")). Interesting question :)

#include <stdio.h>

#define head(h, t...) h
#define tail(h, t...) t

#define A(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) | B(n + 8, tail(c))
#define B(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) | C(n + 8, tail(c))
#define C(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) | D(n + 8, tail(c))
#define D(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) | E(n + 8, tail(c))
#define E(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) | F(n + 8, tail(c))
#define F(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) | G(n + 8, tail(c))
#define G(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) | H(n + 8, tail(c))
#define H(n, c...) (((long long) (head(c))) << (n)) /* extend here */

#define INSN_TO_ENUM(c...) A(0, c, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)

enum insn {
    sysenter = INSN_TO_ENUM('s','y','s','e','n','t','e','r'),
    mov      = INSN_TO_ENUM('m','o','v')
};

int main()
{
    printf("sysenter = %llx\nmov = %x\n", sysenter, mov);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This compiles and looks like it might be doing the right thing, but GCC does not recognize the L in %Lx and it wants to treat the num as a 32-bit int (maybe because I'm compiling for the x86 architecture). –  David Grayson Mar 2 '12 at 16:37
    
Ouch! My bad. %L is for long double, should have been %llx, fixed. Nevertheless printf() was just for unit-testing :) –  Bartosz Moczulski Mar 2 '12 at 16:44
1  
I love stack overflow because everyday I learn something new! the head/tail(h, t...) is very nice! I never knew you could stick the ... to one of the arguments like that –  Shahbaz Mar 2 '12 at 17:54
    
In defintion of INSN_TO_ENUM, you don't have to write all those zeros after c, do you? Wouldn't A(0, c) suffice? –  Shahbaz Mar 2 '12 at 17:59
    
@Shahbaz it depends. Without trailing 0, 0, 0... the macro would work (i.e. it would expand, no preprocessing error), but the result would be ((long long) ()) << (0 + 8 + 8 ...) - with () inside! - which would not compile. The trailing zeros cause this to become (0), which is a valid numeric literal convertable to long long. –  Bartosz Moczulski Mar 2 '12 at 18:09

EDIT: This answer may be helpful so I'm not deleting it, but doesn't specifically answer the question. It DOES convert strings to numbers, but cannot be placed in an enum because it doesn't compute the number at compile-time.

Well, since your integers are 64 bit, you only have the first 8 characters of any string to worry about. Therefore, you can write the thing 8 times, making sure you don't go out of the string bound:

#define GET_NTH_BYTE(x, n)   (sizeof(x) <= n?0:((uint64_t)x[n] << (n*8)))
#define INSN_TO_ENUM(x)      GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 0)\
                            |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 1)\
                            |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 2)\
                            |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 3)\
                            |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 4)\
                            |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 5)\
                            |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 6)\
                            |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 7)

What it does is basically to check at each byte whether it is in the limit of the string and if it is, then gives you the corresponding byte.

Note: that this only works on literal strings.

If you want to be able to convert any string, you can give the length of the string with it:

#define GET_NTH_BYTE(x, n, l)   (l < n?0:((uint64_t)x[n] << (n*8)))
#define INSN_TO_ENUM(x, l)      GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 0, l)\
                               |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 1, l)\
                               |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 2, l)\
                               |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 3, l)\
                               |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 4, l)\
                               |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 5, l)\
                               |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 6, l)\
                               |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 7, l)

So for example:

int length = strlen(your_string);
int num = INSN_TO_ENUM(your_string, length);

Finally, there is a way to avoid giving the length, but it requires the compiler actually computing the phrases of INSN_TO_ENUM from left-to-right. I'm not sure if this is standard:

static int _nul_seen;
#define GET_NTH_BYTE(x, n)  ((_nul_seen || x[n] == '\0')?(_nul_seen=1)&0:((uint64_t)x[n] << (n*8)))
#define INSN_TO_ENUM(x)     (_nul_seen=0)|
                              (GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 0)\
                              |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 1)\
                              |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 2)\
                              |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 3)\
                              |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 4)\
                              |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 5)\
                              |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 6)\
                              |GET_NTH_BYTE(x, 7))
share|improve this answer
    
That isn't a compile-time constant, though - is it? –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 2 '12 at 15:15
    
You could possibly make this work using C++11 constexpr, which works with arrays too - at least with gcc-4.6 –  hirschhornsalz Mar 2 '12 at 15:20
    
This wouldn't work in an enum unfortunately because the conditional assignment is only available at runtime. –  Mike Kwan Mar 2 '12 at 15:21
    
The conditional assignment is fine with constexpr, even recursion works. –  hirschhornsalz Mar 2 '12 at 15:24
1  
The question is for C though. Or is there some language extension which allows use of it in C code also? –  Mike Kwan Mar 2 '12 at 15:36

If you can use C++11 on a recent compiler

constexpr uint64_t insn_to_enum(const char* x) {
    return *x ? *x + (insn_to_enum(x+1) << 8) : 0;
}

enum insn { sysenter = insn_to_enum("sysenter") };

will work and calculate the constant during compile time.

share|improve this answer

Some recursive template magic may do the trick. Creates no code if constants are known at compile time.

May want to keep an eye on your build times if you use it in anger though.

// the main recusrsive template magic. 
template <int N>
struct CharSHift 
{
    static __int64  charShift(char* string )
    {
        return string[N-1] | (CharSHift<N-1>::charShift(string)<<8);
    }
};

// need to provide a specialisation for 0 as this is where we need the recursion to stop
template <>
struct CharSHift<0> 
{
    static __int64 charShift(char* string )
    {
        return 0;
    }
};

// Template stuff is all a bit hairy too look at. So attempt to improve that with some macro wrapping !
#define CT_IFROMS(_string_) CharSHift<sizeof _string_ -1 >::charShift(_string_)

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    __int64 hash0 = CT_IFROMS("abcdefgh");

    printf("%08llX \n",hash0);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer, but this is a C project so I am more interested in C solutions, not C++. –  Mike Kwan Mar 2 '12 at 16:19

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