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I have an application which needs to encrypt and decrypt strings. Below is my decryption method:

  public static string Decrypt(string cipherText)
  {
     try
     {
        //Decrypt:
        byte[] keyArray;
        byte[] toDecryptArray = Convert.FromBase64String(cipherText);
        keyArray = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key);
        AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = new AesCryptoServiceProvider();
        Aes.Key = keyArray;
        Aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
        Aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
        Aes.IV = IV;
        ICryptoTransform cTransform = Aes.CreateDecryptor();
        byte[] resultArray = cTransform.TransformFinalBlock(toDecryptArray, 0, toDecryptArray.Length);
        Aes.Clear();
        return UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(resultArray, 0, resultArray.Length);
     }
     catch (Exception ex)
     {
        return "FAILED:*" + cipherText + "*" + ex.Message;
     }
  }

However, this seems to leak. As you can see, all of the variables are scoped locally so they should be released when this block is done. As background, I'm calling this method sometimes almost nonstop.

In order to determine that there was I leak I inundate my server with many requests. By carefully tracing each request through each path of code it takes, I determined this piece of code is the culprit. When commented in my memory use goes up drastically and linearly, when commented out (and simply returning the cipherText) memory use stays even.

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3  
Bad practice returning ex.Message. Let the exception propagate so you'll be sure to know that something bad happened. –  John Saunders Mar 2 '12 at 15:44
2  
do you get a leak if AesCryptoServiceProvider and the transform is wrapped in a using()? –  PeskyGnat Mar 2 '12 at 15:45
    
@JohnSaunders Yes. Everything is in logging/debug mode to try to pinpoint my problem. –  kmarks2 Mar 2 '12 at 15:45
    
Are you 100% sure your memory leak is in this method? What have you used to profile the memory leak? Have you tried to force the local variables in this method to be cleared before returning a value? What have you done to verify the problem? Its highly unlikely such an easy bug to catch would exist in AesCryptoServiceProvider() consider the breath of its usage and its age. What I am hinting at is that this is unlikely the source of your leak. –  Ramhound Mar 2 '12 at 15:48
1  
@kmarks2 - How do you handle the returned value. I would suspect that before this method. Because there really isn't anything it could be. I also suggest a using statement. So update your code, profile the updated code, and report back. Please use proper memory profile software. –  Ramhound Mar 2 '12 at 15:51
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4 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

AesCryptoServiceProvider implements IDisposable. Try to use it in a using-block. Something like the below:

using(AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = new AesCryptoServiceProvider()){
        Aes.Key = keyArray; 
        Aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC; 
        Aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7; 
        Aes.IV = IV; 
        using (ICryptoTransform cTransform = Aes.CreateDecryptor()){
            byte[] resultArray = cTransform.TransformFinalBlock(toDecryptArray, 0, toDecryptArray.Length); 
            Aes.Clear(); 
            return UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(resultArray, 0, resultArray.Length); 
        }
}
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6  
ICryptoTransform also implements IDisposable, so it would need to be wrapped as well –  PeskyGnat Mar 2 '12 at 15:51
    
@PeskyGnat: Right, I have inserted this - Thanks. –  Chris Valentine Mar 2 '12 at 15:53
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Generally you should always dispose objects that implement IDisposable, such as AesCryptoServiceProvider. They usually use unmanaged resources, which aren't cleared by the Garbagecollector. So instead of

AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = new AesCryptoServiceProvider();

write

using (AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = new AesCryptoServiceProvider())
{
}
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  1. Dispose Aes in the finally {} block, so it would be disposed even if an exception happens.
  2. Dispose ICryptoTransform. Since ICryptoTransform is IDisposable dispose it as well wrapping in the using statement

    public static string Decrypt(string cipherText)
    {
       AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes;
    
       try
       {
          //Decrypt:
          byte[] keyArray;
          byte[] toDecryptArray = Convert.FromBase64String(cipherText);
          keyArray = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key);
          Aes = new AesCryptoServiceProvider();
          Aes.Key = keyArray;
          Aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
          Aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
          Aes.IV = IV;
    
          using (ICryptoTransform cTransform = Aes.CreateDecryptor())
          {
            byte[] resultArray = cTransform.TransformFinalBlock(toDecryptArray, 0, toDecryptArray.Length);
            Aes.Clear();
            return UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(resultArray, 0, resultArray.Length);
          }
       }
       catch (Exception ex)
       {
          return "FAILED:*" + cipherText + "*" + ex.Message;
       }
       finally
       {
          Aes.Dispose();
       }
    }
    
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As has been said elsewhere, objects that implement IDisposable do not get garbage collected immediately. If you do not call Dispose on a disposable object, either explicitly or by wrapping it in a using, that object will take longer to get garbage collected.

If you are using a try, you should consider declaring such variables outside of the try and implement the disposal in a finally block. Particularly with AesCryptoServiceProvider, where you want to make sure the Clear() method gets executed even when an error occurs, as a using will not do that for you.

public static string Decrypt(string cipherText)
{
   string decryptedMessage = null;
   AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = null;
   ICryptoTransform cTransform = null;

   try
   {
      //Decrypt:
      byte[] keyArray = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key);
      byte[] toDecryptArray = Convert.FromBase64String(cipherText);

      AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = new AesCryptoServiceProvider();
      Aes.Key = keyArray;
      Aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
      Aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
      Aes.IV = IV;

      ICryptoTransform cTransform = Aes.CreateDecryptor();

      byte[] resultArray = cTransform.TransformFinalBlock(toDecryptArray, 0, toDecryptArray.Length);
      decryptedMessage = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(resultArray, 0, resultArray.Length);
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
      decryptedMessage = "FAILED:*" + cipherText + "*" + ex.Message;
   }
   finally
   {
       if (cTransform != null)
       {
           cTransform.Dispose();
       }

       if (Aes != null)
       {
           Aes.Clear();
           Aes.Dispose();
       }
   }

   return decryptedMessage;
}

You should also consider letting the exception throw, by eliminating the catch block and keeping the finally, and handling it outside this method.

You could also return a bool for success/fail and pass your decrypted string using an out. That way you aren't potentially confusing your errors with your message content:

public bool string Decrypt(string cipherText, out string decryptedMessage)
{
   bool succeeded = false;
   decryptedMessage = null;
   AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = null;
   ICryptoTransform cTransform = null;

   try
   {
      //Decrypt:
      byte[] keyArray = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key);
      byte[] toDecryptArray = Convert.FromBase64String(cipherText);

      AesCryptoServiceProvider Aes = new AesCryptoServiceProvider();
      Aes.Key = keyArray;
      Aes.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
      Aes.Padding = PaddingMode.PKCS7;
      Aes.IV = IV;

      ICryptoTransform cTransform = Aes.CreateDecryptor();

      byte[] resultArray = cTransform.TransformFinalBlock(toDecryptArray, 0, toDecryptArray.Length);
      decryptedMessage = UTF8Encoding.UTF8.GetString(resultArray, 0, resultArray.Length);
      succeeded = true;
   }
   catch (Exception ex)
   {
      decryptedMessage = "FAILED:*" + cipherText + "*" + ex.Message;
   }
   finally
   {
       if (cTransform != null)
       {
           cTransForm.Dispose();
       }

       if (Aes != null)
       {
           Aes.Clear();
           Aes.Dispose();
       }
   }

   return succeeded;
}
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