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Let us say I have a list such as :

Foo : 1st chapter
Foo : 2nd chapter
Bar : 1st chapter
Bar : 2nd chapter
Bar : 3rd chapter
Qux : 1st chapter

I want to insert a blank line (except before the first line, of course) each time a line begins with a different pattern (here 3 letters, but it could be 4-digit years : 2010, 2011, 2012, etc…) in order to have :

Foo : 1st chapter
Foo : 2nd chapter

Bar : 1st chapter
Bar : 2nd chapter
Bar : 3rd chapter

Qux : 1st chapter

How should I proceed ? Thanks in advance...

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
:let x='Foo' | g/^/ let y=split(getline('.'))[0] | if x!=y | s/^/\r/ | let x=y | endif

For simplicity: You can let x='' then :1d

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It works beautifully. But please explain 2 points : 1) if I write Foo, it will not insert a blank line at the beginning of the file ; on the other hand if I insert an altogether different pattern (e.g. Unix) it will insert a blank line at the beginning, while doing the job although there is no "Unix" in the list. 2) If I write "Foo", does it mean that the function will analyze the 3 first characters, and the 4 first characters if I write "Unix" ? –  ThG Mar 2 '12 at 16:11
    
I use split(getline('.'))[0] to get first word of every line as a key to compare. –  kev Mar 2 '12 at 16:16
    
Now, I understand... ;-) . Thanks again –  ThG Mar 2 '12 at 16:24
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In order to accomplish this task, one can use a single :global command inserting a blank after every line that does not start with the same word as the immediately following line:

:g/^\(\w\+\).*\n\1\@!./pu_
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I am overwhelmed by riches : of course it works perfectly. Thank you very much. But now, a beginner's suggestion/request : how about a "solution forensics" to explain to beginners (but SO may not be for beginners) the pro and cons of different solutions allowed by (in that case) Vim ? So many roads lead to Rome... –  ThG Mar 3 '12 at 10:30
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Awk to the rescue!

awk 'x != $1 { if(NR > 1)  print ""; x = $1 } {print}' file.txt > save-me.txt

Overview:

  • x != $1 { ... } run the block when variable x does not equal the first field aka $1
  • if(NR > 1) print ""; print an blank space except on the first record.
  • x = $1 set x to be equal to the first field, $1
  • {print} is shorthand for print the current record

You can filter text from Vim via a filter command like :%!sort. So to answer the proposed question you can do the following:

:%!awk 'x \!= $1 { if(NR > 1) print ""; x = $1 } {print}'

Overview:

  • % is shorthand for a range of the whole file, aka 1,$
  • There is no filename in the example, that is because the lines represented by the range are being feed in via stdin.
  • The output will replace the text in the range.
  • You will have to escape any ! with \!

See the following for more information on Vim's filtering

:h filter
:h :range!
:h :!
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Thanks, it works very nicely ; but I would rather use kev's solution, for one simple reason : it allows me to stay in Vim to do the trick. Nevertheless, thank you for your answer AND for the explanations –  ThG Mar 2 '12 at 16:31
    
I can get behind that. Just remember you can filter from vim like so: %! awk 'x \!= $1 { if(NR > 1) print ""; x = $1 } {print}'. Just have make sure you escape your !. –  Peter Rincker Mar 2 '12 at 16:47
    
Sorry for my late answer : this works exactly as I want. But how can I credit 2 persons (key and you) with an "accepted" answer ? Thanks again ! –  ThG Mar 2 '12 at 22:15
    
I tried it again and I have another question : if I have a succession of dates such as 2011.12.10, 2011.12.25, 2012.01.14, how must I proceed to insert a blank line between 2011 and 2012, but not between the different dates in 2011, i.e. how to make a difference based upon the first 4 characters ? –  ThG Mar 2 '12 at 22:39
    
Awk defaults the field seperator to being whitespace. In your case you probably want to change the field seperator aka FS to .. You can do this as command line flag to awk via -F. So altogether :%!awk -F. 'x \!= $1 { if(NR > 1) print ""; x = $1 } {print}' –  Peter Rincker Mar 2 '12 at 23:12
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