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I'm struggling with finding the best way to implement named pipes IPC with a robust timeout management. I don't mean timeout on establishing a connection but timeout on read/write streams.

All examples I find don't have a timeout implementation.

Can someone give me a working example and/or point me to an example that shows this?

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Are you trying to use straight Named Pipes or are you looking at using WCF over Named Pipes? –  Adam Gritt Mar 2 '12 at 16:13
    
@AdamGritt: straight named pipes. –  Mike B Mar 5 '12 at 7:41
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1 Answer

What you'll probably have to do is do asynchronous reading and writing with NamedPipeClientStream.BeginRead and NamedPipeClientStream.BeginWrite; a timer will then be used to detect when data hasn't been sent or received for a period of time.

Whenever data is sent or received, a DateTime field will be set to DateTime.Now, and each execution of the timer will check on that field to determine if a timeout occurs. If one occurs, the NamedPipeClientStream can be closed, and the exceptions from NamedPipeClientStream.EndRead and NamedPipeClientStream.EndWrite can be caught.

I don't have a working example ready yet, but I'll get to work on one if you need it. Hopefully this will help you out in the mean time.


This is some very rough example code. A lot more would need to be done, such as implement IDisposable and add write methods. This should help illustrate the idea, though. It would probably best to use this code as a model, rather than use it directly. I've tested the code to see if it reads.

//this is a very rough model of how to do it. a lot more would need to be implemented
//i'm assuming you plan to continuously read from it. i can think up another example if you're not
//also not thread safe
public class MyPipeClient
{
    NamedPipeClientStream PipeClient = new NamedPipeClientStream("testpipe1");
    Timer TimeoutTimer;
    DateTime LastRead;
    const int TimeoutSeconds = 120; //2 mins

    //will connect and start receiving
    public void Connect()
    {
        PipeClient.Connect();
        LastRead = DateTime.Now;

        TimeoutTimer = new Timer(TimeoutCheck, this, 0, 1000); //check every second

        Read(this);
    }

    public void Disconnect()
    {
        PipeClient.Close(); PipeClient = null;
        TimeoutTimer.Dispose(); TimeoutTimer = null;
    }

    static void Read(MyPipeClient client)
    {
        PipeState state = new PipeState(client);

        try
        {
            client.PipeClient.BeginRead(state.Buffer, 0, state.Buffer.Length, ReadCallback, state);
        }
        catch (InvalidOperationException) //disconnected/disposed
        {
            return;
        }
    }

    static void ReadCallback(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        PipeState state = (PipeState)ar.AsyncState;
        MyPipeClient client = state.Client;

        client.LastRead = DateTime.Now;

        int bytesRead;

        try
        {
            bytesRead = client.PipeClient.EndRead(ar);
        }
        catch (IOException) //closed
        {
            return;
        }

        if (bytesRead > 0)
        {
            byte[] data = state.Buffer;

            //TODO: something
        }
        else //i've never used pipes, so i'm assuming this behavior exists with them
        {
            client.Disconnect();
            return;
        }

        Read(client);
    }

    static void TimeoutCheck(object state)
    {
        MyPipeClient client = (MyPipeClient)state;

        TimeSpan timeSinceLastRead = DateTime.Now - client.LastRead;

        if (timeSinceLastRead.TotalSeconds > TimeoutSeconds)
        {
            client.Disconnect();
        }
    }
}

class PipeState
{
    public byte[] Buffer = new byte[4096];
    public MyPipeClient Client;

    public PipeState(MyPipeClient client)
    {
        Client = client;
    }
}
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Great example; I'll try this. –  Mike B Mar 5 '12 at 7:42
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