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I'd like to know how to statically initialize a list of dictionaries -- something like this:

Originally, I had a list like this:

consumers = ['aserver.foo.com','anotherserver.foo.com',
             'thirdserver.foo.com','lastserver.foo.com']

But I'd like to have a structure I can address like this:

consumers = [
        'aserver'{
            'hostname'='aserver.foo.com',
            'binddn'=masterbinddn,
            'bindpw'=masterbindpw
            },
        'anotherserver'{
            'hostname'='anotherserver.foo.com',
            'binddn'=masterbinddn,
            'bindpw'=masterbindpw
        }, 
        'athirdserver'{
            'hostname'='athirdserver.foo.com',
            'binddn'=targetbinddn,
            'bindpw'=targetbindpw
        }, 
        'lastserver'{
            'hostname'='lastserver.foo.com',
            'binddn'=targetbinddn,
            'bindpw'=targetbindpw
        }
    ]

The idea being that I can do something like:

for server in consumers:
    do_something_to_server(server['hostname'], server['binddn'], server['bindpw'])

Am I barking up the wrong tree, or just missing something basic?

share|improve this question
    
So why do you think you cant do it? – Jochen Ritzel Mar 2 '12 at 16:01

The following will create a list of dictionaries:

consumers = [
    {
        'hostname': 'aserver.foo.com',
        'binddn': masterbinddn,
        'bindpw': masterbindpw
    },
    {
        'hostname': 'anotherserver.foo.com',
        'binddn': masterbinddn,
        'bindpw': masterbindpw
    }, 
    {
        'hostname': 'athirdserver.foo.com',
        'binddn': targetbinddn,
        'bindpw': targetbindpw
    }, 
    {
        'hostname': 'lastserver.foo.com',
        'binddn': targetbinddn,
        'bindpw': targetbindpw
    },
]

You can then iterate over it like so:

for server in consumers:
    do_something_to_server(server['hostname'], server['binddn'], server['bindpw'])
share|improve this answer
    
This is not syntactically valid. – Marcin Mar 2 '12 at 16:02
1  
@Marcin: Are you sure you're looking at the current version of the answer, and not at some intermediate edit? It works fine in my Python interpreter. – NPE Mar 2 '12 at 16:03
    
Yes, it's valid now that you have changed it. – Marcin Mar 2 '12 at 16:06
    
thank you -- that's what I was missing – Aaron Bennett Mar 2 '12 at 16:38

It sounds like you either want a dictionary of dictionaries, or to add another field to your dictionaries to capture the name you have before them in your pseudo-code.

Also, the main problem you have is that you have dictionary syntax wrong. A literal dictionary is:

{ 'key': 'value'}

# or

dict(key = 'value')

# not

{'key' = 'value'}
share|improve this answer

Just take your structure:

consumers = {
    'aserver': {
        'hostname':'aserver.foo.com',
        'binddn':masterbinddn,
        'bindpw':masterbindpw
        },
    'anotherserver': {
        'hostname':'anotherserver.foo.com',
        'binddn':masterbinddn,
        'bindpw':masterbindpw
    }, 
    'athirdserver': {
        'hostname':'athirdserver.foo.com',
        'binddn':targetbinddn,
        'bindpw':targetbindpw
    }, 
    'lastserver': {
        'hostname':'lastserver.foo.com',
        'binddn':targetbinddn,
        'bindpw':targetbindpw
    }
}

And change the for with:

for server in consumers.values():
    do_something_to_server(server['hostname'], server['binddn'], server['bindpw'])
share|improve this answer
    
Thx, copy pasted and forgot :D – Bogdan Mar 2 '12 at 16:11

You can use little more efficient namedtuple type

from collections import namedtuple
server = namedtuple('server', ('hostname','binddn','bindpw'))

consumers = [
    server(
        hostname = 'aserver.foo.com',
        binddn = masterbinddn,
        bindpw = masterbindpw
            ),
    server(
        hostname = 'anotherserver.foo.com',
        binddn = masterbinddn,
        bindpw = masterbindpw
            ),
    server(
        hostname = 'athirdserver.foo.com',
        binddn = targetbinddn,
        bindpw = targetbindpw
            ),
    server(
        hostname = 'lastserver.foo.com',
        binddn = targetbinddn,
        bindpw = targetbindpw
            ),
    ]

And your loop changes to:

for consumer in consumers:
    do_something_to_server(consumer.hostname, consumer.binddn, consumer.bindpw)

Or even:

for consumer in consumers:
        do_something_to_server(*consumer)
share|improve this answer

Your example datastructure is not valid Python: you can't have strings immediately followed by dictionaries.

But to get a simple list of dictionaries, this would work:

consumers = ['aserver.foo.com','anotherserver.foo.com',
             'thirdserver.foo.com','lastserver.foo.com']

consumer_dict = [{'hostname': consumer, 'binddn': targetbinddn, 'bindpw': targetbindpw}
                 for consumer in consumers
share|improve this answer

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