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I would like to save a string to a file with a python program named Failed.py

Here is what I have so far:

myFile = open('today','r')

ips = {}

for line in myFile:
    parts = line.split(' ')
    if parts[1] == 'Failure':
        if parts[0] in ips:
            ips[pars[0]] += 1
        else:
            ips[parts[0]] = 0

for ip in [k for k, v in ips.iteritems() if v >=5]:
    #write to file called Failed.py
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

file_ = open('Failed.py', 'w')
file_.write('whatever')
file_.close()

Alternatively you can use this version, which will automatically close the file, even if there was an exception:

with open('Failed.py', 'w') as file_:
    file_.write('whatever')
share|improve this answer

You need to open the file again using open(), but this time passing 'w' to indicate that you want to write to the file. I would also recommend using with to ensure that the file will be closed when you are finished writing to it.

with open('Failed.txt', 'w') as f:
    for ip in [k for k, v in ips.iteritems() if v >=5]:
        f.write(ip)

Naturally you may want to include newlines or other formatting in your output, but the basics are as above.

The same issue with closing your file applies to the reading code. That should look like this:

ips = {}
with open('today','r') as myFile:
    for line in myFile:
        parts = line.split(' ')
        if parts[1] == 'Failure':
            if parts[0] in ips:
                ips[pars[0]] += 1
            else:
                ips[parts[0]] = 0
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for using with –  Anentropic Mar 7 '13 at 13:58
myFile = open('today','r')

ips = {}

for line in myFile:
    parts = line.split()
    if parts[1] == 'Failure':
        ips.setdefault(parts[0], 0)
        ips[parts[0]] += 1

of = open('failed.py', 'w')
for ip in [k for k, v in ips.iteritems() if v >=5]:
    of.write(k+'\n')

Check out setdefault, it makes the code a little more legible. Then you dump your data with the file object's write method.

share|improve this answer
    
You need to close files!!! –  plaes Mar 2 '12 at 16:36
    
Exactly, what he said. Append an of.close to the end there. Otherwise you're assuming the GC will close the file. Explicit is better than implicit. Thanks. –  jaime Mar 2 '12 at 17:11
1  
@jaime Really you need to do more than just call close. You need to do it in a finally block to defend against exceptions. The idiomatic way is to use a with context handler. –  David Heffernan Mar 2 '12 at 17:28
    
Yeah thanks. That crossed my mind, but I was worried about explaining when finally gets called. Then after reading your comment I realized he tagged the question python-2.7. Thanks. –  jaime Mar 2 '12 at 18:22

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