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I need to generate a Key from a string, such that I can always create the same key from the same string. (Specifically a Key object, so that I can use it to create a Cipher in turn to create a SealedObject)

Is this possible in Java, and what class/method combination should I be looking at to do so?

Thanks

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won't hashCode() do for you? if not - why? –  amit Mar 2 '12 at 16:32
    
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  JProgrammer Mar 2 '12 at 16:34
    
Not as far as I'm aware, because I'm trying to create a SealedObject in order to encapsulate an object for transmission: I'm not trying to obfuscate the plaintext string into a hash, I'm trying to create a Key (object) –  Jon Story Mar 2 '12 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

For AES encryption:

SecretKeyFactory factory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBKDF2WithHmacSHA1");
KeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec(password, salt, 65536, 256);
SecretKey tmp = factory.generateSecret(spec);
SecretKey secret = new SecretKeySpec(tmp.getEncoded(), "AES");

Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, secret);

byte[] iv = cipher.getParameters().getParameterSpec(IvParameterSpec.class).getIV();
byte[] ciphertext = cipher.doFinal("Hello, World!".getBytes("UTF-8"));

// reinit cypher using param spec
Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES/CBC/PKCS5Padding");
cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, secret, new IvParameterSpec(iv));

Similarly for the deprecated PBKDF1 and insecure DES for communicating with legacy systems or learning purposes:

byte[] salt = {
    (byte)0xc7, (byte)0x73, (byte)0x21, (byte)0x8c,
    (byte)0x7e, (byte)0xc8, (byte)0xee, (byte)0x99
};

int count = 20;

PBEParameterSpec pbeParamSpec = new PBEParameterSpec(salt, count);
PBEKeySpec pbeKeySpec = new PBEKeySpec(password.toCharArray());
SecretKeyFactory keyFac = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
SecretKey pbeKey = keyFac.generateSecret(pbeKeySpec);

Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, pbeKey, pbeParamSpec);

SealedObject sealed = new SealedObject(object, cipher);
...

Note that the iteration count is too low as well in the last example.

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Thanks. Just to be clear, if I performed the same on the server side with the same password, it would produce a cipher that could be used to decrypt the SealedObject? –  Jon Story Mar 2 '12 at 16:47
    
That is correct. As long as you're using the same param and key specs, you will have the same key. –  Eugene Kuleshov Mar 2 '12 at 17:48
4  
This would have been a better answer if you removed the first half. DES is completely broken today, and it is dangerous to use it even as an example (people might copy it without knowing that it was unsafe). –  Rasmus Faber Mar 2 '12 at 21:17
1  
DES is even for these type of things very very outdated. It is both breakable and if you ever user it for anything which has security requirments the presence of straight des will likely give you trouble –  imichaelmiers Mar 3 '12 at 8:27
    
Thanks for the extra details, guys. I'll be sure to use the AES version. –  Jon Story Mar 5 '12 at 1:10

You want to use PBKDF2 or bcrypt for this. The former is more widely used in my experience. It appears, based on this comment, that java does support this.

SecretKeyFactory factory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBKDF2WithHmacSHA1");
KeySpec spec = new PBEKeySpec(password, salt, 65536, 256);
SecretKey tmp = factory.generateSecret(spec);
SecretKey secret = new SecretKeySpec(tmp.getEncoded(), "AES");
share|improve this answer

You can achieve this by Encryption of Java.

At first you need two jars:

  1. bcmail-jdk16-1.46.jar
  2. bcprov-jdk16-1.46.jar

Here is complete example of how to Data Encryption Standard in Java:

import java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException;
import java.security.InvalidKeyException;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;

import javax.crypto.BadPaddingException;
import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.IllegalBlockSizeException;
import javax.crypto.KeyGenerator;
import javax.crypto.NoSuchPaddingException;
import javax.crypto.SecretKey;

import org.bouncycastle.util.encoders.Base64;


public class KeyGen {
    private SecretKey key;
    private Cipher ecipher;
    private Cipher dcipher;
    private static KeyGen keyGen;

    private KeyGen() throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException{
        key = KeyGenerator.getInstance("DES").generateKey();
        ecipher = Cipher.getInstance("DES");
        dcipher = Cipher.getInstance("DES");
        ecipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key);
        dcipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key);
    }

    public static KeyGen getInstance() throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, InvalidKeyException, NoSuchPaddingException {
        if(keyGen == null) {
            keyGen = new KeyGen();
        }
        return keyGen;
    }

    public String encrypt(String str) throws UnsupportedEncodingException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {
        byte[] utf8 = str.getBytes("UTF8");
        byte[] enc = ecipher.doFinal(utf8);
        return new String(Base64.encode(enc));
    }

    public String decrypt(String str) throws IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException, UnsupportedEncodingException {
        byte[] dec = Base64.decode(str);
        byte[] utf8 = dcipher.doFinal(dec);
        return new String(utf8, "UTF8");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InvalidKeyException, NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException, UnsupportedEncodingException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {
        KeyGen keyGen = KeyGen.getInstance();
        String string = "JOYMAA";
        String enc = keyGen.encrypt(string);
        System.out.println(enc);
        String dec = keyGen.decrypt(enc);
        System.out.println(dec);
    }
}

Usage:

KeyGen keyGen = KeyGen.getInstance();
String string = "JOYMAA";
String enc = keyGen.encrypt(string);
System.out.println(enc);
String dec = keyGen.decrypt(enc);
System.out.println(dec);

Hope this will help you.

share|improve this answer
    
DES may not help anybody anymore... –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Feb 20 '13 at 20:41
    
Neither does ECB mode encryption. Having a class named KeyGen performing encryption/decryption does not give much hope either. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Feb 20 '13 at 20:52

What you want is called a hash. The easiest way would be to check out the hashCode() method from the JDK.

But that is not very secure (secure in this context means, that you have only a few collisions). For a better hash you can use MessageDigest, with MD5 or SHA1.

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1  
Have a look at the PBKDF2 key generation method, specified in RFC 2898. There are cryptographic weaknesses in just using the bare hash. –  rossum Mar 2 '12 at 16:47
    
Again, this is missing the point that I don't just want to create a hash so that it's not a plaintext string - I am specifically trying to generate a Key object. –  Jon Story Mar 2 '12 at 16:52
    
@JonStory you can always use a SecretKeySpec to go from a (correct) number of bytes to a key in Java, but I guess that you need a KDF, and given a string probably a PBKDF (password based key derivation function). –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Feb 20 '13 at 20:54

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