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In C++ doing heavy lifting in the constructor is discouraged for, amongst other things, if an exception is thrown after memory allocation a memory leak may be created. In Java it is still discouraged but it holds less importance due to the garbage collector. In objective C where is the stance on the init method with regard to heavy lifting?

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2  
Apple's UIView classes suggest you put your heavy lifting in the viewDidLoad method, so I suspect that a similar rule is in effect. – Ben Clayton Mar 2 '12 at 17:40
    
Realistically speaking, when an init method fails in an iPhone Objective C then the application is probably dead anyway. There are exceptions, of course, but they're handled on a case-by-case basis. So it's mostly a question of how "pure" you want to be and whether your app needs to be especially robust. – Hot Licks Mar 2 '12 at 19:00
    
@HotLicks is this unless someone hasn't followed the convention of not throwing out of init, in which case it will fail? – zode64 Mar 2 '12 at 19:59
    
What I'm saying is that, in normal code, init never fails (except for some specific cases such as initing an NSDate when the source value is invalid). So when init fails something is seriously broken and the app is going to fail anyway. Worrying about heap leaks is kind of meaningless in that case. – Hot Licks Mar 2 '12 at 20:13
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The general guidance is that lazy-load is preferred for anything that's expensive. Generally speaking, init should avoid expensive calls since you might not need the results. Maybe the caller creates this object and then throws it away, or only looks at one value. You'd like to avoid creating massive data structures that aren't needed. This guidance is to improve performance; it is not a hard-and-fast rule.

It's acceptable, but uncommon, to allow init to fail and return nil. See bbum's answer here for the correct approach: Returning nil in the init in Objective C code.

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In Objetive-C, the pattern for an initializer is

-(id)init
{
    if (self = [super init]) {
       // Initialization code here
    }
    return self;
}

If an initializer fails, it should return nil. This means that if your initializer fails, it needs to release self properly to avoid a leak. So I guess you are safe as long as you follow the pattern.

-(id)init
{
    if (self = [super init]) {
        if (myInitializationFunc() == ERR_FAIL) {
            [self release];
            return nil;
        }
    }
    return self;
}
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