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I have a div element on my page with its height set to 100%. The height of the body is also set to 100%. The inner div has a background and all that and is different from the body background. This works for making the div height 100% of the browser screen height, but the problem is I have content inside that div that extends vertically beyond the browser screen height. When I scroll down, the div ends at the point at which you had to begin scrolling the page, but the content overflows beyond that. How do I make the div always go all the way to the bottom to fit the inner content?

Here's a simplification of my CSS:

body {
    height:100%;
    background:red;
}

#some_div {
    height:100%;
    background:black;
}

Once I scroll the page, the blackness ends and the content flows onto the red background. It doesn't seem to matter whether I set the positon to relative or absolute on the #some_div, the problem occurs either way. The content inside the #some_div is mostly absolutely positioned, and it is dynamically generated from a database so its height can't be known in advance.

Edit: Here is a screenshot of the problem: div problem

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This was asked a few weeks ago. I'll see if I can find that question. I believe I commented on it. edit I believe your question is similar to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/9398313/… –  jmbertucci Mar 2 '12 at 17:42
    
please your code for better understanding –  sandeep Mar 2 '12 at 18:01
    
can you post your full code pls –  Sven Bieder Mar 2 '12 at 18:06
3  
You want all my thousands of lines of php code, css and javascript? I posted the portion of css that was relevant to the question... –  Joey Mar 2 '12 at 18:09
2  
NECROPOST IS A GO: setting the overflow property generally fixes issues like these where content inside a div is stretching past it (overflow: hidden;, overflow: scroll;, etc). –  Dropped.on.Caprica May 7 '13 at 21:35
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6 Answers

Here is what you should do in the CSS style, on the main DIV

display:block;
overflow:auto;

And don't touch height

IT WORKS :)

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worked like a charm! thanks dude –  doniyor Aug 3 '13 at 8:23
    
Worked great. I needed to add height: 100% to html, body and the container div to make it fill the height when there was not enough content though. –  Nico Huysamen Aug 29 '13 at 8:22
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Set the height to auto and min-height to 100%. This should solve it for most browsers.

body {
position: relative;
height: auto;
min-height: 100% !important;
}
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solved my prob! +1 thanks –  a.boussema Jul 13 '13 at 3:25
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If you just leave the height: 100% and use display:block; the div will take as much space as the content inside the div. This way all the text will stay in the black background.

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Thanks I tried that but it doesn't work, see screenshot... –  Joey Mar 2 '12 at 17:54
    
Where did you use display: block? I don't see that in your question. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 2 '12 at 17:59
    
I added it to #some_div after Ronnie suggested it, but it didn't fix the problem. –  Joey Mar 2 '12 at 18:02
    
Could you try adding float: none; to the same #some_div css –  RonnieVDPoel Mar 4 '12 at 16:57
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Old question, but in my case i found using position:fixed solved it for me. my situation might have been a little different though. i had an overlayed semi transparent div with a loading animation in it that i needed displayed while the page was loading. so using height:auto / 100% or min-height: 100% both filled the window but not the off-screen area. using position:fixed made this overlay scroll with the user, so it always covered the visible area and kept my preloading animation centred on the screen.

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Try this:

body { 
    min-height:100%; 
    background:red; 
} 

#some_div {
    min-height:100%; 
    background:black; 
} 

IE6 and earlier versions do not support the min-height property.

I think the problem is that when you tell the body to have a height of 100%, it's background can only be as tall as the hieght of one browser "viewport" (the viewing area that excludes the browsers toolbars & statusbars & menubars and the window edges). If the content is taller than one viewport, it will overflow the height devoted to the background.

This min-height property on the body should FORCE the background to be at least as tall as one viewport if your content does not fill one whole page down to the bottom, yet it should also let it grow downwards to encompass more interior content.

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I'm not entirely sure that I've understood the question because this is a fairly straightforward answer, but here goes... :)

Have you tried setting the overflow property of the container to visible or auto? so:

#some_div {
    height:100%;
    background:black; 
    overflow: visible;

}

Adding that should push the black container to whatever size your dynamic container requires. I prefer visible to auto because auto seems to come with scroll bars...

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