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say I have an array of objects with html strings inside (there are other things, but i'm specifically focusing on the html property of each object. e.g.

var items = [{
    html: '<div>test</div>'
}, {
    html: '<div>test</div>'
}, {
    html: '<div>test</div>'
}];

I need to build a string using all of these strings and I need them in the same order they're given to me, so a reverse while loop is out.

is there anything faster at building the html than the following?

var html = [];
for (var i = 0, itemLen = items.length; i < itemLen; i++) {
    html.push(items[i].html)
}
output.innerHTML = html.join('');
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The only way to know for sure is to profile different approaches: jsperf.com. –  Felix Kling Mar 2 '12 at 18:51
    
Here is the test for different approaches: jsperf.com/string-concatenation-perf –  Felix Kling Mar 2 '12 at 18:54
1  
Why would you do a reverse while loop? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 2 '12 at 19:33
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit technically they're the fastest loops: var i = arr.length; while (i--) {}, the only problem is that if i used it to build this string, it would be in reverse order.. so i would have to reverse the data then loop through it, which ends up being more expensive than a regular for loop.. –  tester Mar 3 '12 at 8:43
    
@tester: Why are they the fastest? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 3 '12 at 17:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

faster would be:

var html = '';
for (var i = 0, itemLen = items.length; i < itemLen; ++i)
    html += items[i].html;
output.innerHTML = html;

Edit:

This is faster:

var html = '';
for (var i = 0, itemLen = items.length; i < itemLen; html += items[i++].html);
share|improve this answer
    
^ win check the url that Felix posted above: jsperf.com/string-concatenation-perf –  Brian Mar 2 '12 at 19:02
    
I'm sorry, my version wasn't faster... . But now I've got a version faster ("another version"): jsperf.com/string-concatenation-perf/5 –  user1150525 Mar 2 '12 at 19:20
    
Oh for the love of Pete lmao yes, yes you did haha I really don't know that the extra 0.000001 teraflops of CPU we're saving are really going to impact the end user that much, but kudos lol I think you've boiled it down to its rawest form there :P –  Brian Mar 2 '12 at 19:25
    
It still falls in the error margin though, at least in Chrome. –  Felix Kling Mar 3 '12 at 11:14

This is much faster than yours

var html = '';
for (var i = 0, itemLen = items.length; i < itemLen; i++) {
    html += items[i].html;
}
output.innerHTML = html;
share|improve this answer
    
++i would be even more faster than i++. –  user1150525 Mar 2 '12 at 18:49
    
@user1150525: I doubt it would make a notable difference. –  Felix Kling Mar 2 '12 at 18:50
    
Don't forget to create a variable to hold items.length so there isn't a penalty on the lookup of the length parameter. –  skyronic Mar 2 '12 at 18:51
1  
@skyronic I'm pretty sure he's doing that at the beginning of the for loop. the variables are chained –  tester Mar 2 '12 at 18:56
    
ha ha, so whos the winner? –  Starx Mar 2 '12 at 19:25
var html = '';
for (var i = 0, itemLen = items.length; i < itemLen; i++) {
    html += items[i].html;
}
output.innerHTML = html

Simply concatenating to a string would be faster than building an array and imploding it as that technically double loops the data instead of looping it once.

share|improve this answer
    
rofl at 3 of us doing the exact same thing :P –  Brian Mar 2 '12 at 18:50
    
nope, mine's is faster :D. ++i is faster than i++, but thats an extremly small difference. –  user1150525 Mar 2 '12 at 18:51
    
just curious, wouldn't ++i miss the zero index? –  tester Mar 2 '12 at 18:53
    
no, because it is executed after the end of html += .... ; . –  user1150525 Mar 2 '12 at 18:54
    
@user1150525: I only believe that yours is faster if you show me a jsperf.com test which proofs it. –  Felix Kling Mar 2 '12 at 18:58

This does the trick too:

var items = [
    {html: '<div>test</div>'},
    {html: '<div>test</div>'},
    {html: '<div>test</div>'}],
    newString = "";
items.forEach(function(item) {
    newString = newString + item.html;
});

Demo.

share|improve this answer
    
But its slower than the normal way. –  user1150525 Mar 2 '12 at 19:38
    
@user1150525: It's simply more proper since we have objects as associative arrays involved. In terms of speed, you're right, but I'm just giving you another option. –  Purag Mar 2 '12 at 20:16

Warning this is solution could cause a lot problems. But it does give a relatively fast way to do what you want.

var items = [{
    html: '<div>test</div>'
}, {
    html: '<div>test</div>'
}, {
    html: '<div>test</div>'
}];

Object.prototype.toString=function(){return this.html};

items.join('');

If there is anyway to control the object that gets added to the array in the first place then you can change only that object's prototype which won't mess with the global Object.

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