Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

At my current place of employment there are a handful of maybe two to three employees that add and maintain functionality of legacy fortran77 code. When I was first hired I briefly considered trying to become fluent in the ancient language, soon after I changed my mind.

This conclusion came from a combination of reasons; initially I admit the steep learning curve pushed me away. (Directly related to having a majority of my experience programming in a much higher language. Not so much that Fortran had advanced complex functionally that was mind-boggling. ) But even after I began to develop a trivial understanding of the language I found that I never had any useful ‘projects’ I could contribute. Which lead me to the realization, what good would Fortran77 be on my application if I were job searching again? It occurred to me that, unless I was interested in maintaining legacy code that some unknown long since retired employee had written thirty+ years ago, I should spend my time learning a newer, more utilized, language.

Google trends makes an interesting graph, to my point, when given Fortran.

Also interesting to note is that the combined sum of Fortran tagged questions on stackoverflow is less than 100 at the time of this post.

So what new projects and applications are suitable for a groundwork built in Fortran? Is there a large need for Fortran engineers to develop new products, or mostly to maintain old code? Has anybody heard of any recent application development surrounding Fortran?

Ultimately, is the return worth the investment in learning Fortran for a new engineer these days?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Bill the Lizard Feb 22 '12 at 15:09

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Better answers might be forthcoming if you would tell us your interests, like what kind of software do you want to develop? As noted in some of the answers already, FORTRAN is still heavily used in science. If you want to work in that environment, learning FORTRAN would probably be beneficial (having it on my resume helped me get my current job). OTOH, if you want to do accounting software, try another language. And steep learning curve? I found FORTRAN easy, after learning BASIC, Pascal, & Assembler (I've added many more languages since). What do you program in now? –  PTBNL Jun 5 '09 at 4:16
    
Currently programming in java, php, and perl. I guess the overwhelming FORTRAN feeling I experienced at first was looking at thousands of lines of code that have been written over the past 40+ years at work. It is confusing to even the individuals that maintain it. After I started reading the manuals that feeling of confusing went away; but I was still far away from being able to program the elaborate Fortran that is used to calculate the adjusted fan speed of a jet engine. So this conclusion that “Fortran is easy” is very much dependent on it’s application. –  Cimplicity Jun 5 '09 at 10:26
    
@Isaacs: I've found that thousands of line of code in any language can be overwhelming. This is especially true if there is no documentation and no one to learn from. If you have one or both of those and an interest in the language and/or the application, I recommend you take advantage of it and learn it! If nothing else, once you've learned it in FORTRAN, you might get to re-write the application in a language you like better - if you can convince your boss it is a good thing to do. –  PTBNL Jun 5 '09 at 14:01

9 Answers 9

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I will answer your question a bit later, but first I'll address adress one other point - or should I say, one other oversight, that seems to be occuring regularly amongst questions that include the tag "fortran".


Fortran first appeared in 1950s (1957), depending on your definition of "appear". From then till now, it has gone through several versions:

  • I, II, III, IV
  • 66
  • 77
  • 90, 95
  • 2003, 2008 (WIP)

(bold ones are considered major steps in language development)

It was developed from the start, and with the goal to be a language for primarily numerical computations. Hence the name - FORTRAN - *FOR*mula *TRAN*slation language.

Due to computer technology advancement in the sixties, seventees and eightees, and due to not having any alternatives (C was introduced much later, and because of its design it was never popular amongst the same crowd that used fortran), a vast amount of production code was written in fortran.
That same amount of code had to be maintained, and that was one of the major considerations, (and still is) when a new fortran standard is introduced - fortran90. It took the whole fortran77 as a subset, making it very easy to maintain and develop new code which would be easily connectible to old, already written one, but also it introduced a large number of new features.

New standards were introduced after fortran90 as well, and although some features of the language have been declared obsolete, some even deleted, you'll find that most vendor's compilers support all fortran features from '77, but also support new features from '2003 standard.
Anyway, you can find more on these on wikipedia's article about fortran.


Now I'll comment and address some of the questions in your post.

At my current place of employment there are a handful of maybe two to three employees that add and maintain functionality of legacy fortran77 code. When I was first hired I briefly considered trying to become fluent in the ancient language, soon after I changed my mind. *This conclusion came from a combination of reasons; initially I admit the steep learning curve pushed me away.*

What does your company do (in general) ?

Although I've seen fortran described as a "legacy language", "old", "ancient", even "dead", I've never ever seen it being described as a language that had a "steep learning curve". An old IBM manual on fortran77, which was my first introduction to the language many years ago, had no more than 50 pages or so of one side print.
What parts did you find uncomprehensible, and how much effort did you put in clarifying them ?

But even after I began to develop a trivial understanding of the language I found that I never had any useful ‘projects’ I could contribute.

Numerical weather prediction, finite element analysis, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), computational physics, and computational chemistry are just some of the areas in which you'll find it used. It is one of the most popular languages in the area of high-performance computing and is also used for programs that benchmark and rank the world's fastest supercomputers.

I find it hard to believe that you couldn't contribute to either of these areas. Of course, if you're not interested in neither of these, and wish to work on office applications or web development, then indeed maybe, it is a wrong language to begin with.

Which lead me to the realization, what good would Fortran77 be on my application if I were job searching again? It occurred to me that, unless I was interested in maintaining legacy code that some unknown long since retired employee had written thirty+ years ago, I should spend my time learning a newer, more utilized, language.

I agree. I agree throughly.
You shouldn't try and learn fortran77. It is, even by a conservative point of view, an old language. However, learning fortran90/95 and studying new features of the 2003 and 2008 standard is the way to go. Maintaining old '77 code shouldn't present any problems, and writing new code should be done in newer standards, which also include some features for easier organizing your programs. OO-programming is also supported, although, it differs to some degree from the C's point of view.

Google trends makes an interesting graph, to my point, when given Fortran. Also interesting to note is that the combined sum of Fortran tagged questions on stackoverflow is less than 100 at the time of this post.

Mathematicians, engineers, physicians ... all combined, do not make up very large percent of the general population. Never did. The difference is that 40 years ago, when a big amount of fortran code was written, they were one of the rare ones that had access to computers. So it gave the illusion that everyone was using fortran in those days.

Nowadays, the number of people in those areas remain pretty much the same, only compared to total number of computer users, it presents a much smaller percentage.

So what new projects and applications are suitable for a groundwork built in Fortran? Is there a large need for Fortran engineers to develop new products, or mostly to maintain old code? Has anybody heard of any recent application development surrounding Fortran?

I know several, but I doubt their names will mean anything to anyone in here. They're not applications which pickle the public interest, nor are they applications that are publicly available.

Ultimately, is the return worth the investment in learning Fortran for a new engineer these days?

I can't answer that. I can add however, that, it is a language with excellent features for engineering purposes, to which an alternative is still not quite in sight (many have tried - they said fortran was dead in the 80ties, they repeated it all through the 90ties, ... now in the "zeroes" it's still here like it was before). It is also a language with very strong corporate backing - (few languages have more companies actively developing compilers than fortran) which is not gonna go just like that (kinda like Microsoft Clippy).


Of course, I couldn't finish this post without some kind of a reward for the ones that made it all the way till the end :-)

alt text

share|improve this answer
    
Answers: Industry: Aviation (engine development and testing.) The learning curve was steep for me because the majority of my programming experience is in python, perl, java, and other higher-level languages. I’m would not say incomprehensible, more tedious and just generally different then my experience with other languages. I’d like to hear of the development and what is going on with new Fortran applications. That’s one primary reason I posted the question. –  Cimplicity Jun 5 '09 at 4:03
    
+1 for not just thoroughness, but for saying everything I would have said (and more) better than I would have said it. –  PTBNL Jun 5 '09 at 4:11
    
If you're, on the other hand, interested in development of the language, and where is it going, you could take a look at comp.lang.fortran, on usenet - there are several people there that were or still are were highly influental in evolution of the language as it is today. They certanly know more about it, and would probably answer all your questions if nicely asked. –  ldigas Jun 5 '09 at 12:48
    
By "physicians", do you actually mean "physicists"? –  FJDU Aug 6 '13 at 18:43
    
@Idigas, what's that comic suppose to mean? –  Pacerier Aug 30 '13 at 12:00

I work in high-performance computing and numerical weather prediction, and we are definitely using Fortran for new and old projects. I can't speak for other shops, but I know that several of us use Fortran 90 exclusively, but there are many that still use FORTRAN 77 because it's what they know, what they're comfortable with, and apparently things like dynamic memory allocation, and free-form formatting aren't important to them.

If you're in one of these areas where it's prevalent, I think it would be useful to have a basic reading knowledge of the language. Even when the paradigm moves from pure Fortran from beginning to end to something like Python for the high-level control and Fortran for the "hard" parts, knowing your way around will suit you well. Depending on previous language experience, I don't think that would be too difficult to pick up.

While there is still development and ongoing work in the Fortran language itself (e.g. Fortran 2003), I'd be thrilled if we finally got everyone caught up to Fortran 90!

share|improve this answer

A qualified yes but mostly no...

For me Fortran is used similarly at work it is possibly worth the investment since it makes you better at your job. However as a purely academic exercise I wouldn't think so. In my understanding is nothing makes it especially important to learn from a stand point of personal improvement.

If it will really help in your job its worth it to familiarize yourself with any language. They are all so interrelated its not that big a deal to learn a new language if it helps you at work.

But for purely academic language learning work on something fun like Haskell or something that can help to you build your understand of the hardware like assembler or C.

A similar post with some good information can be found here.

share|improve this answer

...is the return worth the investment...

If it interests you then yes. Period.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yep, the return on investment depends on the interest rate. Wait, are we talking Fortran, or finance?-) –  Alex Martelli Jun 5 '09 at 2:03
1  
Usually all programming languages interest me. So its not a question of if it interests me. I'm wanting to know if in today's market-place learning Fortran is a good move for building your career profile for a new engineer entering the field. –  Cimplicity Jun 5 '09 at 3:48
    
If it interests you then learn it. Having a broader understanding of languages is always a benefit, not a hindrance. Your question is nowhere near the decision like journalism vs. physics. If you want to learn it, put it on your list, prioritize to your own life, and pick it up when you get a chance. It's as simple as my answer. –  Colin Burnett Jun 5 '09 at 4:09

I think learning new languages in general is always a good thing. That said, if you're learning to enhance your own value (and not just for the fun of it), it's probably better to just learn something a little more relevant/in demand in your job search area. This will give you a better return for your time investment, IMHO.

share|improve this answer

Does your boss think it would be helpful to him/her? Not to be a total brown-nose, but this person should have an immediate impact on your situation and it makes sense to make their job easier.

If there are other languages you can put to use at your job, learn those.

Although FORTRAN may not open any job opportunities, the fact that you learned the language needed to do your job shows you're capable and you care. You don't want to be sitting in your next interview describing your current tech. situation and mention the use of FORTRAN which you have zero understanding (OK, you could probably avoid that with little effort.).

I learned FORTRAN in grad. school, created one app (Couldn't get it to compile on Win98) and haven't used it since - no regrets.

share|improve this answer

Like @Idigas, I was going to comment on "steep learning curve," which made me chuckle.

But then I realized what's hard about Fortran (and old-style BASIC, and assembly language) to a modern programmer is the discipline to prevent the code from turning into spaghetti.

Is that what you meant by learning curve? Because both Fortran and BASIC seem like languages you pick up in an afternoon.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the famous arithmetic GOTO and the "spaghetti al dente" programming. Fortran90 took care of those that 20 years ago ... like Tim Whitcomb said, "I'd be thrilled if we finally got everyone caught up to Fortran 90!". And what's even worse, people don't realize how useful "that GOTO" was for several decades. For some things it is still today a most effective solution (not the arithmetic one, but the GOTO). –  ldigas Jun 5 '09 at 3:43
    
Some versions of BASIC had a computed goto also. –  Nosredna Jun 5 '09 at 3:45
    
No, I'm not arguing that point. I'm not arguing any points actually. Just pointing out that modern fortran has solid features for code organization (there is a better term than "code organization", but it's late and I can't remember how it's said in english) –  ldigas Jun 5 '09 at 3:50
    
I think perhaps I should edit the post. It reminded me of assembly, which I had to use in college. Assembly wasn't hard to learn once you get past idea that it isn't your favorite scripting language. But it took me some time to get into the correct mindset. –  Cimplicity Jun 5 '09 at 4:12

Ressurrecting an old thread here but what the hell. I'd say yes, it's a good investment -- and (as hinted by Alex Martelli above) investment is the operative word here ! Why ? Because the investment growth models used by banks and insurance companies use Fortran extensively. Look through job ads in the financial services area and you'll see an occasional ad for guys with any kind of M.S. / Ph.D. that involved modelling with Fortran and familiarity with common Fortran subroutine libraries. investment models use large matrix manipulations and this is where Fortran excels. I also agree with Nosredna's comment on Fortran being one of the fastest languages to teach yourself. This is especially true if you are anyway mathematical, as the Fortran coding system seems intuitively appropriate (and efficient) for this way of thinking.There's also plenty of good textbooks on it (cf. Amazon for value s/hands) as well as free compilers and free subroutine libraries (LAPACK, Intel). So it will only cost you your time. You'd also have a language that few of your peers have, since todays engineers (be they regular engineers like civil/mech/elec or electronic/software engineers) are only taught C/C++ and Java. These finance jobs are well salaried, whatever about the boring environment. So it's a GO from this end !

P.S. @ Christian below : Just to clarify things a bit. There's no suggestion that Cimplicity ought not learn the standard languages of the day like C/C++ & Java. One of either Perl, Python, Ruby, etc would be damn handy these days on his resumé too. But my impression of his original post was that he's already done the usual B.S. course and was in a job/sector where Fortran was sometimes used and he was evaluating the merits of learning it. Hardly any one in computing stays in the same sector all their working life. Sometimes jobs are hard to find, especially if you don't want to move house. People have to have a greater level of versatility to be employable today. Investment/economic modelling may not the most fashionable job amongst programmers. But, for those who have it, it is - at the very least - a good old number while they wait for better horizons. For people already with some knowledge of economics or just interestable in it, it may be much more. Anyway, I thought it time that this little 'secret' niche for Fortran programmers was held up to the light . . . No doubt there are several other such 'secret' Fortran niches.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for interesting answer. I wouldn't have thought of insurance and investment agencies using Fortran for models. Awesome tidbit of info to remember. –  Cimplicity Feb 21 '12 at 15:36

I think it depends on where you want to be. There are a lot of older systems that were developed in Fortran and need to be maintained. There's probably a lot of money in this.

But if you want to be cutting edge (and possibly less stable..) then learn Java or C#, or Ruby/ PHP/ ASP.NET for web dev.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.