Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This might seem like a silly question to the more seasoned C++ coders out there, but I thought once you have a class and you create an object of that class, you call a public method of that class using the object you created (unless it is a static method, in which case you call it either using an object or the class name itself)?

Then why does this work?

Function definition:

template <typename Object>
void printList(const List<Object>& theList) {
    if (theList.isEmpty())
        cout << "Empty list!" << endl;
    else {
        ListItr<Object> itr = theList.first();
        for(; !itr.isPastEnd(); itr.advance())
            cout << itr.retrieve() << " ";
    }

    cout << endl;
}

Function call:

printList(myList);

What am I missing here? How does the rest of the program know that printList() belongs to the class List<int> unless I call printList() using an object of List<int>?

This works too by the way, I just checked. I would have used this way of calling and defining the function. Note that this time the function is defined using the this pointer, the way I would have thought it works.

Function definition:

template <typename Object>
void List<Object>::printList() {
    if(this->isEmpty())
        cout << "Empty list!" << endl;
    else {
        ListItr<Object> itr = this->first();
        for(; !itr.isPastEnd(); itr.advance())
            cout << itr.retrieve() << " ";
    }

    cout << endl;
}

Function call:

myList.printList();
share|improve this question
1  
How does the rest of the program know that printList() belongs to the class List<int> Does it? Why does it take a List<int> as a parameter, then? Looks to me like you created a free function, not a member function... especially since when you do create a member function in your second example, your show with your usage of List<Object>:: that you're doing these function definitions outside of a class definition. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 2 '12 at 18:55
    
Because ... that's not a method in a class. It's a simple function. –  Brian Roach Mar 2 '12 at 18:58
    
Thanks - I fixed that and made the first one a member function; and now it needs the object to be able to be called. Still seems strange why it needs the object also passed as a parameter when the same can be done with using 'this'. –  Ambidextrous Mar 2 '12 at 19:02
    
@Ambidextrous: If it's a member function, then it doesn't need the object passed as a parameter, and you shouldn't do that. Which C++ book are you using? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 2 '12 at 19:04
1  
@Ambidextrous: By editing your question in this way, you have completely and fundamentally changed it, rendering all the answers completely useless. Please do not do that. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 3 '12 at 2:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your understanding is correct. Unless you are failing to tell us something important about List<>, or missing some important lesson in the book, the second example is clearly superior to the first.

Then why does this fragment need the object itself to be passed?

Because it is coded that way. Seriously, you'd need to ask the author of that code, who is probably the author of your book.

What am I missing here?

The two examples are not identical. The first one implements "given two List<>s, a and b, ask a to print the contents of b: a.printList(b)". The second implements "given one List<>, a, ask a to print the contents of itself: a.printList().

It is possible that the book's authors are trying to explain that very distinction. I don't know what they are trying to show, I haven't read the book.

Why not just use this?

If you trying to achieve the 2nd objective I listed above, namely allow a List to print itself, you should just use this.

share|improve this answer

Taking a shot in the dark here, but are you expecting the following function to be a member function of T?

void print(const T& someT);

Because it's not. It's just a free function that takes a T.


The following is a class definition and member function declaration (though the member function is silly because it takes an argument that is probably completely redundant):

struct T {
   void print(const T& someT);
};

And the following is the same silly member function defined out-of-line:

void T::print(const T& someT) {
   // ...
}

It's not entirely clear from your question which one you're really doing here, but the first one is definitely not a member function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks - fixed that and made it a member function - I should rephrase my question. It now needs an object in order for the call to be made, still to me the method using 'this' seems sufficient. –  Ambidextrous Mar 2 '12 at 19:04

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.