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From http://www.learncpp.com/cpp-tutorial/125-the-virtual-table/, code such as

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void function1() {};
    virtual void function2() {};
};

class D1: public Base
{
public:
    virtual void function1() {};
};

class D2: public Base
{
public:
    virtual void function2() {};
};

generates a virtual table similar to http://www.learncpp.com/images/CppTutorial/Section12/VTable.gif: enter image description here

The virtual table as above makes sense. After all the objects need a way to call functions, and need to use function pointers to find them.


What I do not understand is why this is only required in case of using virtual functions? I am definitely missing something since a virtual table does not directly depend on virtual functions.

As an example, if the code being used were

class Base
{
public:
    void function1() {};
    void function2() {};
};

...

Base b;
b.function1();

and there is no virtual table (meaning there is no pointer to where the function resides), how would the b.function1() call resolve?


Or is it that we have a table in this case as well, just that it is not called a virtual table? In that case the question would arise as to why we need a new kind of table for virtual functions?

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1  
Please realize that the vtable is an implementation detail. There is no requirement in the language as to the form, function, or even existence of the virtual table. Your compiler might happen to use one, and it might happen to look like your picture. But then again, it might not. –  Robᵩ Mar 2 '12 at 20:18
    
You will also get a vptr when you derive virtually. Other than that, why create a vptr/vtable, when you don't need it? –  PlasmaHH Mar 2 '12 at 21:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

[If] there is no virtual table (meaning there is no pointer to where the function resides), how would the b.function1() call resolve?

There is a "pointer", inside the compiler as it's parsing and analysing your code. The compiler's the thing that decides where the function will be generated, so it knows how calls to said function should resolve. In concert with the linker, this all happens tidily within the build process.

The only reason that this doesn't work for virtual functions is that which function you call depends on a type known only at runtime; in fact the same function pointers are present verbatim in the virtual table, written there by the compiler. It's just that in this case, there are multiple to choose from, and they cannot be chosen from until long (read: potentially months or even years!) after the compiler ceases to be involved at all.

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Hey, my 2000th answer! :D –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Mar 4 '12 at 2:54

There's already a good answer, but I'll attempt a slightly simpler (albeit longer) one:

Think of a non-virtual method of the form

class A
{
public:
  int fn(int arg1);
};

as equivalent to a free function of the form:

int fn(A* me, int arg1); // overload A

where me corresponds to the this pointer inside the method version.

If you now have a subclass:

class B : public A
{
public:
  int fn(int arg1);
};

this is equivalent to a free function like this:

int fn(B* me, int arg1); // overload B

Note that the first argument has a different type to the free function we declared earlier - the function is overloaded on the type of the first argument.

If you now have some code calling fn() it will choose the overload based on the static type (compile time type) of the first argument:

A* p;
B* q;
// ...
// assign valid pointer values to p and q
// ...
int a = fn(p, 0); // will call overload A
int b = fn(q, 0); // will call overload B

The compiler can and will determine the function to call at compile time in each case and can emit assembly code with a fixed function address or address offset. The concept of a runtime virtual table is nonsensical here.

Now, when I said to think of the method version as equivalent to the free function version, you'll find that at the assembly language level, they are equivalent. The only difference will be the so-called mangled name that encodes the type in the compiled function name and distinguishes overloaded functions. The fact that you call methods via p->fn(0), that is, with the first argument before the method name is pure syntactic sugar - you're not actually dereferencing the pointer p in the example, even though it looks like it. You're just passing p as the implicit this argument. So, to continue the above example,

p->fn(0); // will always call A::fn()
q->fn(0); // will always call B::fn()

because fn being a non-virtual method means the compiler dispatches on the this pointer's static type, which it can do at compile time.

Although virtual functions use the same calling syntax as non-virtual member functions, you are in fact dereferencing the object pointer; specifically, you're dereferencing the pointer to the object's class's virtual table.

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