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I'm doing my homework, and am stuck on some logic (I think I used that term correctly?). I'm writing an application that shows 12 buttons numbered 1-12, 2 pictures of dice, and a Roll button.

The player rolls the dice (2, 6 sided die) and whatever number(s) he gets, he can use to "cover" some of the twelve numbers. For example, let's say he rolls the dice and gets a 3 and a 5. He gets to choose whether to cover the 3 and the 5, or the total of the two numbers - 8 (Did I mention I'm a math wiz?).

The goal of the game is to cover all the numbers using the least amount of rolls.

The problem I'm having is with, what I believe to be, the if statements:

if (die1 == 3 && die2 == 5) {
  player can cover 3 and 5, or 8, but not both
}

Now, I think this works, but if I wrote all this out it would be 36 if statements (give or take zero). Is there an easier way?

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post you code, we will try to simplify it –  dantuch Mar 2 '12 at 19:29
1  
check out the Specification design pattern en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specification_pattern. I think it could help you with your problem. –  Songo Mar 2 '12 at 19:30
    
Can he only cover if the sum is 8? –  tom Mar 2 '12 at 19:30
1  
Don't worry about what he can cover, simply check the player input (what they attempt to cover) against the dice roll. –  Brian Roach Mar 2 '12 at 19:33
1  
Yeah "covering" is just pushing the button and then it displays " ". Thanks Brian, that's a great idea! Corbin, yes, when the user tries to click a number. Tom no, just the sum of any two numbers that were "rolled". Everyone gave me great ideas. Now I have to go read more so I can understand them. High Five for learning Java! –  Punkrockie Mar 2 '12 at 19:35

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

By your description I think the player can select die1, die2 or die1 + die2, so to see if the user selected a valid value you need just one if.

if (cover == die1 or cover == die2 or cover == ( die1 + die2)) {
    //valid..
}
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no if statement needed. player can cover die1 and die2 or die1+die2

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Don't understand the downvote here...The idea is that there is no need to code any "magic numbers" just use the variables –  Chimoo Mar 2 '12 at 19:34
    
explain yourselves... –  Chimoo Mar 2 '12 at 19:35
    
how does this help him with his 'homework'. This is just repeating the question. –  tom Mar 2 '12 at 19:36
    
I agree. I think it makes sense –  RasTheDestroyer Mar 2 '12 at 19:36
    
repeating the question in a way to let them understand that there is no need for if statements or switch statements, the variables are all that's needed to see which values are allowed –  Chimoo Mar 2 '12 at 19:37

This is a good example to use a switch case, IMO. That'd be 2 switchs which have 6 cases each.

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1  
You should provide an example of this. –  Ryan Amos Mar 2 '12 at 19:41

Don't check until the player tries to cover something. By only validating the input you simplify everything down to one if statement.

If you do need to know all possibilities (maybe to show the player possible moves), then ... you still don't need all those if statements. Simply highlight the buttons that match the dice roll and only accept those as input; you'll want to index them in an array or map by their value (e.g. "1") as a way to retrieve them.

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You know with two dice you always have three covering options. Presumably elsewhere in code you're going to compare your covered options with numbers. Something like

int[] covered = { die1, die2, die1+die2 };
// ... other stuff
if (comparisonValue > 6) {
  // maybe do special stuff since this uses both dice
  if (comparisonValue == covered[2]) {
    // covered/coverable behavior
  } else {
    // not
  }
} else {
  // maybe do special stuff since this only uses one die
  if (comparisonValue == covered[0] || comparisonValue == covered[1]) {
    // covered/coverable behavior
  } else {
    // not
  }
}

gives you first what's covered, then simple use of it. You could also foreach over the array to do stuff for the covered numbers, ala

for (int c : covered) {
  // do stuff with c because it's covered
}

That's fairly fragile, but the flexible answer (e.g., dumping the outcomes into Collection) is way overkill for 6-sided, integer face dice, and the really flexible answer (e.g., accommodating a variable number of dice, specialized combination of faces into outcomes) is like nuclear armageddon for this particular problem.

EDIT for your particular problem, I'd do something like

// start new turn, disable all buttons
// get rolls
int[] coverable = { die1, die2, die1+die2 };
for (int covered : coverable ) {
  // enabled covered button
}

If the player can change which of the 1-12 are covered by previous rolls based on a new outcome, well, then you could be in for some fun depending on how much help you want to give them.

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I would probably create 2 new objects and use them with a lookup table, like so:

class TossResult{
    int firstDie;
    int secondDie;
 }

Class Coverage{
    TossResult tossResult;

    int getThirdNumber(){
        return tossResult.firstDie + tossResult.secondDie;
     }
}

Then on application start-up, populate your map:

HashMap<TossResult, Coverage> lookup = new HashMap<>();
for (int i = 0, i < SIDES_ON_DIE; i++){
    for (int j = 0, j < SIDES_ON_DIE; j++){
        TossResult tempResult = new TossResult(i,j);
        Coverage tempCoverage = new Coverage(tempResult);
        lookup.put(tempResult, tempCoverage);
    }
}

After a user rolls the dice, create a new TossResult and do a lookup.get(tossResult)

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You could also create an array of 12 ints or bools. Initialize all 12 elements (say to 0 or false). Then for each role you can do something lik:

if (false == myArray[die1Value] && false == myArray[die2Value]) {
    myArray[die1Value] = true;
    myArray[die2Value] = true;
} else if (false == myArray[die1Value + die2Value]) {
    myArray[die1Value + die2Value]
} else if (false == myArray[die1Value] || false == myArray[die2Value]) {
    if (false == myArray[die1Value]) {
        myArray[die1Value] = true;
    }
    if (false == myArray[die2Value]) {
        myArray[die2Value] = true;
    }
} else {
    // all 12 covered
}

And certainly you can refactor this code some more. The stated goal "The goal of the game is to cover all the numbers using the least amount of rolls." is not doable, really. The best you can do is to use probabilities to know if, for instance, you should cover on a roll of 1 and 2, a 1 and 2, or 3 first:-)

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