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I created a UIbutton programatically in this way:

UIButton *button = [UIButton buttonWithType:UIButtonTypeRoundedRect];
[button addTarget:self action:@selector(hideOrShowWithButtonId:)forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchDown];

The objective of this button is that when it is pressed, the contents of a section in a uitableview dissapears, and when clicking back on it, the contents come back. So when this button is clicked, it is calling the function below: (NOTE: self.cinemaButton, self.taxiButton and self.foodButton are STRINGS and NOT BUTTONS)

-(void)hideOrShowWithButtonId:(id)sender;
{
NSArray *dummy=[[[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:nil] autorelease];
NSArray *dummy2=[[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:self.cinemaButton,self.taxiButton,self.foodButton,nil];
NSLog(@"%@",self.taxiButton);
if([[dummy2 objectAtIndex:[sender tag]]isEqual:@"Hide"])
{
    NSLog(@"Want to hide");
    [self.sections removeAllObjects];
    switch ([sender tag]) {
        case 0: 
            [self.sections addObject:dummy];
            [self.sections addObject:self.taxiFavorite];
            [self.sections addObject:self.foodFavorite];
            [self.tableView reloadData];
            self.cinemaButton=[NSString stringWithString:@"Show"];
            break;            
        case 1: 
            [self.sections addObject:self.cinemaFavorite];
            [self.sections addObject:dummy];
            [self.sections addObject:self.foodFavorite];
            [self.tableView reloadData];
            self.taxiButton=[NSString stringWithString:@"Show"];
            break;
        case 2: 
            [self.sections addObject:self.cinemaFavorite];
            [self.sections addObject:self.taxiFavorite];
            [self.sections addObject:dummy];
            [self.tableView reloadData];
            self.foodButton=[NSString stringWithString:@"Show"];
            break;
    }
    NSLog(@"%@",self.taxiButton);
}
else
{
    NSLog(@"Want to show");
    switch ([sender tag]) {
        case 0: 
            [self.sections replaceObjectAtIndex:0 withObject:self.cinemaFavorite];
            [self.tableView reloadData];
            self.cinemaButton=[NSString stringWithString:@"Hide"];
            break;            
        case 1: 
            [self.sections replaceObjectAtIndex:1 withObject:self.taxiFavorite];
            [self.tableView reloadData];
            self.taxiButton=[NSString stringWithString:@"Hide"];
            break;
        case 2: 
            [self.sections replaceObjectAtIndex:2 withObject:self.cinemaFavorite];
            [self.tableView reloadData];
            self.foodButton=[NSString stringWithString:@"Hide"];
            break;
    }
}
[dummy2 release];
NSLog(@"%@",self.taxiButton);

}

The Problem with this function is that the string (for example in my case: self.taxi) is exiting with a value @"Show", but when pressing the button again, it has a value of @"Hide" The value of the string self.taxibutton is not changing. So the function is only able to hide the contents of the section and not show them again. Any reason why this is happening? Is there any easier way to perform this task of hiding/showing contents of a particular section in a UItableView?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In answer to your question "Is there an easier way", you might want to take a look at some working demo code from Apple at this link. This code shows how to have collapsible sections. I tried to develop this my self, and ran into some difficulties before concluding that my problems were eliminated by the methods used in this code. The key is to maintain a table that holds information for every section, including pointers to the header views for each section. I adapted this demo code, and it worked fine immediately. You should be able to compile and run the code yourself.

Here is a little unsolicited advice: You should choose more descriptive names for your variables if you wnat others to review it and offer advice. The purpose of dummy and dummy2 is not obvious, and it gives the immediate impression that offering help is going to require more effort than it should.

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