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I have a div tag with width set to 800px. When the browser width is greater than 800px, it shouldn't stretch the div but it should bring it to the middle of the page.

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18 Answers 18

up vote 435 down vote accepted
<body>
    <div style="width:800px; margin:0 auto;">
        centered content
    </div>
</body>
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11  
This is correct for demo purposes, but obviously not using inline styles in the final markup –  gonzohunter Jun 5 '09 at 10:36
34  
Just make sure to apply 'text-align: center' to the <body> or else IE6 will not center the div. Then add text-align: left; to your div. –  avdgaag Jun 5 '09 at 15:08
1  
be sure to check HTML mode for IE6 or 7. If you use anything other than 4.01 strict you may have problems. Most of the time text-align works as avdgaag says. –  bartosz.r Oct 6 '11 at 10:05
    
Thanks, it helped me to center align the div tag from my external css. –  Rashmi May 31 '12 at 11:10
    
thanks, really helped me –  StackOverflowError Oct 2 '13 at 15:33
  1. Do you mean that you want to center it vertically or horizontally? You said you specified the height to 800px, and wanted the div not to stretch when the width was greater than that...

  2. To center horizontally, you can use the margin: auto; attribute in css. Also, you'll have to make sure that the body and html elements don't have any margin or padding:

    html, body { margin: 0; padding: 0; }
    #centeredDiv { margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto; width: 800px; }
    
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it works perfectly. –  garik Apr 15 '13 at 18:31

To make it also work correctly in Internet Explorer 6 you have to do it as following:

HTML

<body>
    <div class="centered">
        centered content
    </div>
</body>

CSS

body {
    margin: 0;
    padding: 0;
    text-align: center; /* !!! */
}

.centered {
    margin: 0 auto;
    text-align: left;
    width: 800px;
}
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Or go out from quircks mode and use a strict mode, it helps a lot, when you want to use features like hover, auto-margins and many others. –  bartosz.r Oct 6 '11 at 10:06

If you have some regular content and not only one line of text, so only possible reason I know is to calculate margin.
Here is an example:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org /TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd"> 
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> 
    <head> 
        <title></title> 
        <style type="text/css"> 
            body 
            { 
                margin: 0; 
                padding: 0; 
            }

            .common 
            { 
                border: 1px solid black; 
            }

            #supercontainer
            {
                width: 1200px;
                background: aqua; 
                float: left;
            }

            #middlecontainer
            {
                float: left;
                width: 104px;
                margin: 0 549px;
            }

            #container { 
                float: left;
            } 

            #first { 
                background: red; 
                height: 102px; 
                width: 50px; 
                float:left;
            }

            #second { 
                background: green; 
                height: 50px; 
                width: 50px;
            } 

            #third { 
                background: yellow; 
                height: 50px; 
                width: 50px;
            }
        </style> 
    </head> 
    <body> 
        <div id="supercontainer">
            <div id="middlecontainer">
                <div class="common" id="first">first</div>
                <div id="container">
                    <div class="common" id="second">second</div> 
                    <div class="common" id="third">third</div> 
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

So, "supercontainer" is your "whole page" and it's width is 1200px.
"middlecontainer" is DIV with content of your site; it's width 102px. In case, the width of content is known, you need to divide page's size to 2, and substruct from result half of content's width:
1200 / 2 - (102 / 2) = 549;

Yes, I'm also see that this is DER GROSSE fail of CSS.

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This works in IE also, Auto Margins do not.

.centered {
    position:           absolute;
    display:            inline-block;
    left:           -500px;
    width:          1000px;
    margin:             0 50%;
}
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I tried it out: jsfiddle.net/nqEar/show On my monitor (1920px) on Chrome 22 it is not centered. –  threeFourOneSixOneThree Oct 28 '12 at 7:54

Simply use center tag just after body tag, and end center tag just before body ends

<body>
<center>
........your code here.....
</center>
</body>

This worked for me with all the browsers I have tried

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22  
The <center> tag was deprecated in html 4 –  ManseUK May 11 '12 at 10:52
1  
@ManseUK IE was deprecated in html 0! –  Lucas Henrique Jul 15 at 1:56

Some other pre-existing setups from older code that will prevent div page centering L&R are: 1) other classes hidden in external stylesheet links. 2) other classes embedded in something like an img (like for older external CSS Print format controls). 3) legend code with IDs and/or CLASSES will conflict with a named div class.

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Position absolute and then top:50% and left:50% places the top edge at vertically center of the screen, and left edge at horizontally center, then by adding margin-top to negative of height of the div i.e -100 shifts it above by 100, similarly for margin-left. This gets div exactly in the center of the page.

<div id="outPopUp"></div>

#outPopUp{
     position:absolute;
     width:300px;
     height:200px;
     z-index:15;
     top:50%;
     left:50%;
     margin:-100px 0 0 -150px;
     background:red;
}
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4  
Thanks, your answer helped clarify some other answers for me. +1 added. –  WhatsInAName Jun 12 '13 at 20:24
1  
Thx, your answer is the one and only cross-browser solution, it should be accepted...worth mentioning that it also works with "position:relative" if you have other divs on top and below (in this case only "left:50%" and "margin:0px -150px;" are important). –  Marcus Nov 22 '13 at 14:51
    
thanks for this, the best answer. –  Alok Anand Mar 12 at 7:00
    
position: fixed worked for me and might work best for anyone else where the added div is in some tree of absolute/relative divs already. –  ʍǝɥʇɐɯ May 28 at 14:04

You can also use like this..

<div style="width: 60%; margin: 0px auto;">
         Your Contents Here...
</div>

Hope this may helpful to some one.,

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2  
my preferred choice. –  Nisk Apr 13 '13 at 20:51
1  
+1 for simple code –  user1542476 May 8 '13 at 13:03

<div style="display: table; margin-right: auto; margin-left: auto;"></div>

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Use css flex property: http://jsfiddle.net/cytr/j7SEa/6/show/

body {                       /* centerized */
  display: box;
  flex-align: center;
  flex-pack: center;
}
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So this doesn't work on IE? –  Umair Apr 10 at 19:53

Div centered vertically and horizontally inside parent without fixing content size

Check out this example (click). Very simple, and works for flexible heights too. Perfect if you don't have content with fixed height.

And here (click) is a nice overview with some other solutions.

And here (click) another example with a flexible width solution with the famous -50% trick

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body, html{
    display:table;
    height:100%;
    width:100%;
}
.container{
    display:table-cell;
    vertical-align:middle;
}
.container .box{
    width:100px;
    height:100px;
    background:red;
    margin:0 auto;

}

http://jsfiddle.net/NPV2E/

"width:100%" for "body" tag it's only for example. In real project you may remove this property.

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Centering without specifying div width:

    body{
        text-align: center;         
    }
    body *{
        text-align: initial;
    }       
    body div{
        display: inline-block;          
    }

This is something like <center> tag does, except:

  • all direct inline childs elements (eg. <h1>) of <center> will also positioned to center
  • inline-block element can have different size (comapred to display:block setting) according to browser defaults
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i am a little late to the game, but i don't see this answer and this is what i use. you can add this class to your div (which should have a set width) or add the margin stuff to your div class

.marginAutoLR
{
    margin-right:auto;
    margin-left:auto;
}

OR

.divClass
{
    width:300px;
    margin-right:auto;
    margin-left:auto;
}
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The next solution worked great for me, I created a div that margin 50% from the page to the left and wrap it with another div that calculate the extra div width:

<div style="margin-left: -200px;">
<div style="margin-left: 50%; width: 400px">
     centered content
</div>
</div>
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Following CSS code will place your div exact center of the screen

.exactCenter {
    width:400px;
    height:400px;
    position: fixed;
    background-color: #00FF00;
    top: 50%;
    left: 50%;
    margin-top: -200px;
    margin-left: -200px;
}

More about ....Div on center of screen

George

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<body>
<div style=" display: table; margin: 250 auto;">
    In Center
</div></body>

If you want to change the vertical position, change the value of 250 & you can arrange the content as per your need.No need to give the width & other parameters.

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protected by Community Mar 15 '13 at 9:58

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