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I have a question regarding ResultSet objects in Java and recursion.

I was working on some code for university and whenever I found a descendant I recursed on with that new node but when I came out of the recursion and tried to rs.next() the pointer had gone from pointing to row 1 back to row 0 and when it hit row 0 the rs.next() failed and it returned! I knew there was one thing in there that it hadnt read yet! What is it that causes this?

The only way I got round that problem was to go through the resultset and get every element and add it into an array list, then loop through the arraylist doing the recursion on each element in the array! Surely this must be a better way around this?

if it helps this is the new code I'm using

    private Vector<String> getDescendents(String dogname, Vector<String> anc) {
    if (anc == null) anc = new Vector<String>();
    ArrayList<String> tempList = new ArrayList<String>(2);
    try {
        System.out.println("Inside ");
        childStmt.setString(1,dogname);
        childStmt.setString(2,dogname);
        ResultSet rs = childStmt.executeQuery();
        System.out.println("Before while "+rs.getRow());
        while (rs.next()){
            String col1 = rs.getString(1);
            tempList.add(col1);
            anc.add(col1);
        } 
        for (String s:tempList){
            getDescendents(s,anc);

        }

    }
    catch(Exception e) {
        doError(e, "Failed to execute ancestor query in getBreeding");
    }
    return anc;

}

However before this, i had the getDescendents call inside the while loop and thus no for loop and no arraylist either, but whenever it actually recursed it would loose track of the resultset when it returned out of the recursion.

Further details : When I used the debugger (nearly said gdb there lol far too much C) the ID of the result set was the same but the row pointer had returned to 0 and the rs.next call failed!

Once again any explanation is appreciated!

Regards, Andrew

p.s it previously looked like

    private Vector<String> getDescendents(String dogname, Vector<String> anc) {
    if (anc == null) anc = new Vector<String>();
    ArrayList<String> tempList = new ArrayList<String>(2);
    try {
        System.out.println("Inside ");
        childStmt.setString(1,dogname);
        childStmt.setString(2,dogname);
        ResultSet rs = childStmt.executeQuery();
        System.out.println("Before while "+rs.getRow());
        while (rs.next()){
            String col1 = rs.getString(1);
            anc.add(col1);
            getDescendendts(col1,anc);
        } 

    }
    catch(Exception e) {
        doError(e, "Failed to execute ancestor query in getBreeding");
    }
    return anc;

}
share|improve this question
    
What did the previous bit of code look like? –  nicholas.hauschild Mar 2 '12 at 19:40
    
Recursion in Java is usually a bad idea due to no tail call optimization. Recursion in the middle of opening a result set is a terrible idea. –  Nathan Hughes Mar 2 '12 at 19:41
    
Yeah i agree I hate recursion but the task requires it :P its good for things like tree traversal which tranversing descendants etc is very similar to, @nicholas.hauschild edited it in at the bottom –  andrewktmeikle Mar 2 '12 at 19:46

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

It looks like you're re-using childStmt; don't do this. From the Statement javadoc:

By default, only one ResultSet object per Statement object can be open at the same time. Therefore, if the reading of one ResultSet object is interleaved with the reading of another, each must have been generated by different Statement objects. All execution methods in the Statement interface implicitly close a statment's current ResultSet object if an open one exists.

You'll have to either save all the rows first, then do the recursive query, or create a new Statement for each ResultSet you want to fetch.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. You beat me by 5 seconds :-) –  JB Nizet Mar 2 '12 at 19:41
    
So is that because when I execute a statement its similar to opening a new connection to the database so when I call the childstmt again it reopens the connection and I loose what the previous statement had? Jeez reading that javadoc makes recursion sound like a terrible idea! Thanks, much appreicated! –  andrewktmeikle Mar 2 '12 at 19:45
    
It's probably due to a design decision to keep Statement simple. Handling multiple ResultSets per Statement would introduce more complexity, so they assume that if you're going to re-use a statement, you're already done with the previous data. In non-reursive cases this is probably true. –  beerbajay Mar 2 '12 at 19:51
    
Also, when doing recursive DB lookups you should either: use built-in recursive queries (oracle's CONNECT BY; postgres' WITH RECURSIVE) or fetch each level of the hierarchy in batches (i.e. first all the nodes at level 0, then all the nodes at level 1) and join them in-memory; hitting the DB hundreds of times gets horribly slow. –  beerbajay Mar 2 '12 at 19:53
    
@beerbajay Yeah seems sensible, I probably modify the existing code so its possible to create a new childstmt instead of reusing the same one. Thanks, a very quick response and most helpful community! much appreciated! –  andrewktmeikle Mar 2 '12 at 19:55

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