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I have following function

public static string TestFunc(this DateTime dt)
{

}

What "this" stands here for ?

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possible duplicate of this parameter modifier in C#? –  Henk Holterman Mar 2 '12 at 19:51
    
If you're gonna correct it you should at least correct the grammar as well,... It should read "what does "this" stand for in this context?" as oppose to "what "this" stands here for ?" –  Justin Kirk Mar 2 '12 at 19:52
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It makes this method an extension method. It extends the DateTime struct.

You can call it like this

DateTime dt = DateTime.Now;
string s = dt.TestFunc();

The compiler rewrites the last line internally to

string s = TestFunc(dt);

If the extension method was declared like this

public static string TestFunc(this DateTime dt, string format)
{      
}  

you could call it like this

string s = dt.TestFunc("dd.MM.YY");

Extension methods must be declared in a static class. They can be used in other classes, if the namespace of the declaring class is available (either because it is in the same namespace or because you imported the namespace with using). If you import System.Linq you will see a lot of extension methods (in intellisense) extending all sorts of collections implementing IEnumerable<T>. A blue arrow is displayed for extension methods in the member list.

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In this context, it is used to define an extension method.

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It's the syntax used to define an Extension method. It can be called as a normal static function:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Today;
string s = ClassName.TestFunc(dt);

or as an "extension" of DateTime:

DateTime dt = DateTime.Today;
string s = dt.TestFunc();
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That is used to extend the DateTime type, that is all.

Extension Methods

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You've found an extension method for the DateTime type.

So now, without any changes to the existing DateTime code, you can do the following:

DateTime MyDT = DateTime.Now;
string MyStr = MyDT.TestFunc();
// continue using MyStr as you wish...
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