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Not sure if I can do this or not, but I'm trying to see if a type inherits from another type with a generic constraint.

Here is the class I want to find:

public class WorkoutCommentStreamMap : ClassMapping<WorkoutCommentStream>...

And here is the test

var inheritableType = typeof(NHibernate.Mapping.ByCode.Conformist.ClassMapping<>);
var isMappedObject = inheritableType.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(WorkoutCommentStreamMap));

If I change the first line to below, it works. But that defeats the purpose of my example. My fallback work around is to put a custom, non-generic, interface on all the objects I want to find and use the same call.

var inheritableType = typeof(NHibernate.Mapping.ByCode.Conformist.ClassMapping<WorkoutCommentStream>);
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is not an inheritance relationship between a generic type definition and a closed generic type. Therefore, IsAssignableFrom will not work.

However, I use this little extension method to achieve what your after:

public static bool IsGenericTypeOf(this Type t, Type genericDefinition)
{
    Type[] parameters = null;
    return IsGenericTypeOf(t, genericDefinition, out parameters);
}

public static bool IsGenericTypeOf(this Type t, Type genericDefinition, out Type[] genericParameters)
{
    genericParameters = new Type[] { };
    if (!genericDefinition.IsGenericType)
    {
        return false;
    }

    var isMatch = t.IsGenericType && t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == genericDefinition.GetGenericTypeDefinition();
    if (!isMatch && t.BaseType != null)
    {
        isMatch = IsGenericTypeOf(t.BaseType, genericDefinition, out genericParameters);
    }
    if (!isMatch && genericDefinition.IsInterface && t.GetInterfaces().Any())
    {
        foreach (var i in t.GetInterfaces())
        {
            if (i.IsGenericTypeOf(genericDefinition, out genericParameters))
            {
                isMatch = true;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    if (isMatch && !genericParameters.Any())
    {
        genericParameters = t.GetGenericArguments();
    }
    return isMatch;
}

With sample usage:

Nullable<int> value = 9;
Assert.IsTrue(value.GetType().IsGenericTypeOf(typeof(Nullable<>)));
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Holy fantasticness –  Trent Mar 2 '12 at 20:14

You can use BaseType, IsGenericType and GetGenericTypeDefinition to recurse up the hierarchy and try to find it:

public bool IsClassMapping(Type t)
{
    while (t != null)
    {
        if (t.IsGenericType &&
            t.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(ClassMapping<>))
        {
            return true;
        }
        t = t.BaseType;
    }
    return false;
}
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What you're trying to do will not work, and its called out explicitly in the MSDN documentation why:

A generic type definition is not assignable from a closed constructed type. That is, you cannot assign the closed constructed type MyGenericList<int> to a variable of type MyGenericList<T>

IsAssignableFrom seems like overkill here; can you just use BaseType to check for a matching type?

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DOH! Was right there on the page I was looking at. Thanks. –  Trent Mar 2 '12 at 20:11
    
@Trent: Note that you'll need to go up the hierarchy if you want to include subclasses of WorkoutCommentStreamMap etc. –  Jon Skeet Mar 2 '12 at 20:35
    
@Reddog had the best answer. I can roll than into my linq query and its still pretty. –  Trent Mar 2 '12 at 21:00

There is never an inheritance relation between MyType<>, MyType<T> and MyType<ConcreteType>! In consequence, they will never be assignment compatible.

An exception are interface types having generic parameters with an in or out keyword.

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Perhaps this will help?

    public static bool IsConcreteGenericOf(this Type type, Type openGeneric)
    {
        if (!type.IsGenericType)
            return false;
        if (!openGeneric.IsGenericType)
            return false;
        if (!openGeneric.IsGenericTypeDefinition)
            return false;

        return type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == openGeneric;
    }

Sorta simlar to Jon Skeet's answer, he beat me to it.

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With 400k+ I think Skeet beats alot of people to it –  Trent Mar 2 '12 at 20:25
    
LOL, that's true. –  ananthonline Mar 2 '12 at 20:50

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