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I used this gem in my application, but I'm not sure the difference between the different implementation options for the gem:

  • form_for
  • form_tag with block
  • form_tag without block

Can anyone clarify? I understand that form_for is used when you wish to interact with a model, but what about the other two?

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possible duplicate of Difference between form_for , form_tag? –  Daniel Lang Aug 4 '13 at 15:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The differences are subtle, but important. form_for is a more advanced tool that yields an object you use to generate your form elements:

<% form_for(@foo) do |form| %>
  <%= form.text_field(:bar) %>
<% end %>

The form_tag method is much more primitive and just emits a tag. If you want to put things inside of the <form> tag that's emitted, you put things inside the block:

<% form_tag do %>
  <%= text_field_tag(:bar, 'bar_value') %>
<% end %>

Note that the form_for method handles grabbing values from your model, and will at least try to route the form to the appropriate action. With form_tag you are responsible for everything as it makes no assumptions about what you're doing.

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As far as I know there is only one simple difference. form_tag without a block will only generate a html element for you. When you use form with a a block it will also create the form closing tag .

In example:

<% form_tag("/comments") %>

will result in

<form action="/comments">

Where

<%= form_tag("/comments") do %>
  <%= submit_tag %>
<% end %>

will generate

<form action="/comments">
  <input type="sumbit" />
</form>
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One uses model binding and the other doesn't

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