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The default ErrorMessage for StringLength validation is a lot longer than I'd like:

The field {Name} must be a string with a maximum length of {StringLength}.

I would like to change it universally to something like:

Maximum length is {StringLength}.

I'd like to avoid redundantly specifying the ErrorMessage for every string I declare:

    [StringLength(20, ErrorMessage="Maximum length is 20")]
    public string OfficePhone { get; set; }
    [StringLength(20, ErrorMessage="Maximum length is 20")]
    public string CellPhone { get; set; }

I'm pretty sure I remember there being a simple way to universally change the ErrorMessage but cannot recall it.

EDIT:

For the sake of clarification, I'm trying to universally change the default ErrorMessage so that I can input:

    [StringLength(20)]
    public string OfficePhone { get; set; }

and have the error message say:

Maximum length is 20.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

You can specify the StringLength attribute as follows on numerous properties

[StringLength(20, ErrorMessageResourceName = "StringLengthMessage", ErrorMessageResourceType = typeof(Resource))]
public string OfficePhone { get; set; }
[StringLength(20, ErrorMessageResourceName = "StringLengthMessage", ErrorMessageResourceType = typeof(Resource))]
public string CellPhone { get; set; }

and add the string resource (named StringLengthMessage) in your resource file

"Maximum length is {1}"

Message is defined once and has a variable place holder should you change your mind regarding the length to test against.

You can specify the following:

  1. {0} - Name
  2. {1} - Maximum Length
  3. {2} - Minimum Length

Update

To minimize duplication even further you can subclass StringLengthAttribute:

public class MyStringLengthAttribute : StringLengthAttribute
{
    public MyStringLengthAttribute() : this(20)
    {
    }

    public MyStringLengthAttribute(int maximumLength) : base(maximumLength)
    {
        base.ErrorMessageResourceName = "StringLengthMessage";
        base.ErrorMessageResourceType = typeof (Resource);
    }
}

Or you can override FormatErrorMessage if you want to add additional parameters. Now the properties look as follows:

[MyStringLength]
public string OfficePhone { get; set; }
[MyStringLength]
public string CellPhone { get; set; }
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Is there a way to override the default, without having to have ErrorMessageResourceName = "StringLengthMessage", ErrorMessageResourceType = typeof(Resource))] for every user-inputted string in my schema? –  snumpy Mar 2 '12 at 21:24
    
No. But you can subclass StringLengthAttribute and specify the default values. See the update to my answer. –  Werner Strydom Mar 2 '12 at 21:36
    
can I specify a StrengLength (i.e. [MyStringLength(30)]? –  snumpy Mar 2 '12 at 21:44
    
Yes, that will use the second constructor: MyStringLengthAttribute(int maximumLength) –  Werner Strydom Mar 2 '12 at 22:00
    
The top portion of your code works wonderfully (once I figured out how to make a resource file); however, the StringLengthAttribute override seems to only work on the server. I'm not receiving Client-side validation when using [MyStringLength] or [MyStringLength(30)]. Is there a way to have both server- and client-side validation for this override of StringLength? –  snumpy Mar 5 '12 at 15:10

Try [StringLength(20, ErrorMessage="Maximum length is {1}")], if I recall correctly that should be it.

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And adding the error message to a resource file means it is only specified once. –  Werner Strydom Mar 2 '12 at 21:11
    
@WernerStrydom, Please post an answer for how to specify it only once, as that is my question. –  snumpy Mar 2 '12 at 21:13
    
Yeah I noticed that after I reread your question later. But it looks like you got the full answer you were looking for now. –  Yarx Mar 12 '12 at 22:33
    
@Yarx: Where did you find the string format placeholder values? It isn't in the MSDN documentation. –  m-y Aug 15 '13 at 14:08
    
I don't recall but upon looking into the source of the StringLengthAttribute, you can find the placeholder logic there. {0} = Field Name, {1} = Max Length, {2} = Min Length –  Yarx Aug 15 '13 at 16:36

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