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The following method is used to determine whether or not a chess piece is blocked from making a certain move. At the point that this method is called, the motion itself (i.e. a Bishop's ability to move diagonally) has already been validated -- this method will then look at the "path" that the piece must take.

As is painfully clear, this method is full of redundancy. In fact, there are 6 nearly-identical for-loops, the differences being 1) which variables are controlling the iteration, 2) whether the variable is incrementing or decrementing, and 3), in the case of the diagonal motion, the inclusion of a statement to increment/decrement both the x and y variables simultaneously.

I have made numerous attempts to abstract these statements into a separate method. Unfortunately, the limiting factor has been need to access the board[y][x] -- When I've tried to abstract the logic, I lose sight of which variable represents the y and which the x.

So, my question is this: what tools can Java provide me to abstract this logic and reduce or eliminate redundancy in this method? I will point out that I am quite new to the language, so please don't take my disregard for common idioms as intentional or simply obtuse; I'm learning!

Thanks.

private static boolean notBlocked(Piece[][] board, int xfrom, int yfrom, int xto, int yto) {

    int x = xfrom;
    int xstop = xto;
    int y = yfrom;
    int ystop = yto;

    int xinc = (x < xstop) ? 1 : -1;
    int yinc = (y < ystop) ? 1 : -1;

    Piece to = board[yto][xto];
    Piece from = board[yfrom][xfrom];

    if (xfrom == xto) {
        // x is constant, check in y direction
        if (y <= ystop) {
            for (; y <= ystop; y += yinc) {
                if (board[y][x] != null && board[y][x] != to && board[y][x] != from) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        } else {
            for (; y >= ystop; y += yinc) {
                if (board[y][x] != null && board[y][x] != to && board[y][x] != from) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
    } else if (yfrom == yto) {
        // y is constant, check in x direction
        if (x <= xstop) {
            for (; x <= xstop; x += xinc) {
                if (board[y][x] != null && board[y][x] != to && board[y][x] != from) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        } else {
            for (; x >= xstop; x += xinc) {
                if (board[y][x] != null && board[y][x] != to && board[y][x] != from) {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }
    } else if (Math.abs(xfrom - xto) == Math.abs(yfrom - yto)){
        // the move is diagonal
        if (y <= ystop) {
            for (; y <= ystop; y += yinc) {
                if (board[y][x] != null && board[y][x] != to && board[y][x] != from) {
                    return false;
                }
                x += xinc;
            }
        } else {
            for (; y >= ystop; y += yinc) {
                if (board[y][x] != null && board[y][x] != to && board[y][x] != from) {
                    return false;
                }
                x += xinc;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}

EDIT:

Wow... much better now!

private static boolean notBlocked(Piece[][] board, int xfrom, int yfrom, int xto, int yto) {

    Piece from = board[yfrom][xfrom];
    Piece to = board[yto][xto];

    // Determine the direction (if any) of x and y movement
    int dx = (xfrom < xto) ? 1 : ((xfrom == xto) ? 0 : -1);
    int dy = (yfrom < yto) ? 1 : ((yfrom == yto) ? 0 : -1);

    // Determine the number of times we must iterate
    int steps = Math.max(Math.abs(xfrom - xto), Math.abs(yfrom - yto));

    if (xfrom == xto || yfrom == yto || Math.abs(xfrom - xto) == Math.abs(yfrom - yto)) {
        for (int i = 1; i < steps; i++) {
            int x = xfrom + i * dx;
            int y = yfrom + i * dy;
            if (isBlocked(board, from, to, x, y)) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Think about writing this function in terms of one step in the right direction. Suppose that you can fill in two variables dx and dy that represent how much you move in the x and y directions on each step. You can compute this by looking at the difference between the start and end x and y locations. Once you have that, you can then write a single for loop that tries moving along that direction, checking each step. For example:

for (int i = 1; i < numStepsRequired; i++) {
    int currX = x + i * dx;
    int currY = y + i * dy;
    if (board[currY][currX] != null) {
        return false;
    }
}

You would also need to compute how many steps are required, which would also be straightforward as long as you're computing dx and dy. I'll leave this as an exercise, since it's good programming practice.

Hope this helps!

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Thank you! This is a clearly superior perspective. I appreciate the direction. –  Zachary Allaun Mar 2 '12 at 23:05
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