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I'm using go language and it seems good practice to communicate between different threads/routines by channels and locks instead of datastore. However, it appears that it's not possible between two instances if there's more than one instance running. Is there a way to make it not open a second one, even if there's high traffic?

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Have you tried to use memcache instead of the datastore to sync threads? –  Christopher Ramírez Mar 3 '12 at 2:39
    
I haven't tried either one of them. I wanted to sync them with channels and locks. I guess I don't know enough about good practice in Google Go. The first thing I'll do will be learn good practices for syncing threads. –  SomeBloke Aug 10 '12 at 10:54

3 Answers 3

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You should use Backends if you want fine to control the spawning and shutdown of instances.

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To answer the question in the title: Go to app dashboard, on left you will find a Application settings link. In the admin UI you will find two sliders, drag the first one at the very left and the second (Min pending Latency) to the max allowed value (right). And last but not least, optimize your request response time.

Even if you do the above there's no guarantee that GAE will not fire up a second instance.

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I don't think it is absolutely the right approach .. You have to think about scalability issues from the first day of your design .. As christopher said I would go with memcache!

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You're probably right and I'll do that. I didn't choose you as a correct answer to help googlers find the answer if they really want to control spawning and shutdown of isntances. –  SomeBloke Aug 10 '12 at 10:56

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