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we have a complex .net 2.0 app which uses css as intended. for some reason a subset of web pages renders as if there is nothing on the page in ie9. if you set ie9 to "no style", everything that should be there is visible.

we are using the correct mime types on the css files. there are no warning or error messages in the developer tools console. these same pages render without a problem with ie7 or ie8. because we use asp client side validation we are unable to verify how these pages look with alternate browsers.

we tried removing the css link, no difference. if you use the developer tools and click on one of the "invisible" elements (td for the most part) tools will highlight its location on the page and a check of the css it has inherited looks reasonable.

so at this point we are stumped. we have tried validating the html but there are too many issues for the validator to make much progress, mostly related to the pages being tagged as xhtml transitional. that particular setting was done long before i came on board so i have no idea of whether there was any real thought into choosing it or whether it was just a .net 2 default.

any suggestions on analysis tools or approaches to solving this type of problem?

=== followup ===

not sure if its a css issue or not.

the page in question was using a frameset with the following pattern (details ommitted)

frameset rows="xxx,xxx"

    frame style="left: 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px"

    frameset cols="xxx,xxx"

        frame  

        frame 

and thru a process of elimination we found that

"style="left: 0px; position: absolute; top: 0px"

was the cause of the problem. after finding that the individual frames could be loaded by themselves and they would display without a problem, we started attacking the frameset an element at a time and when the style was removed it would work.

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1  
frames? seriously? –  Joseph the Dreamer Mar 3 '12 at 10:32
    
please show some real time code/fiddle/screen shot how can we test. –  w3uiguru Mar 3 '12 at 12:18
    
evidently frames are passe but the snippet above was the essence of the page. –  dan- Mar 3 '12 at 23:17

1 Answer 1

Gladly you already gave he awnser your self

We have tried validating the html but there are too many issues for the validator to make much progress, mostly related to the pages being tagged as xhtml transitional.

It is very common for a web browser not to display a thing on a page if the page is broken. Even if you are using xhtml transitional, it is a good practice to validate the page and fix the errors.

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