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Edit

So I did try again, with a new file called test2.py and it works. I packaged repoman , and test.py is in the src folder. I modified test.py after I created and installed my repoman egg. I think that's the problem. But thanks for the help. Do you guys think that's the exact reason?


import unittest
import requests
from repoman.core import ultraman, supported
from repoman.ext import writefile,locate_repo

class TestWriteFile(unittest.TestCase):

    def setUp(self):
        self.username = 'dummy'
        self.password = 'dummy'
        self.remote   = 'http://192.168.1.138:6666/scm/hg/NCL'

    def test_scm_permission(self):
        """
        Test SCM login.
        """
        r = requests.get("http://192.168.1.138:6666/scm/", auth=(self.username, self.password))
        self.assertTrue(r.ok)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

Running python test.py I get this error:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 7, in <module>
    class TestWriteFile(unittest.TestCase):
  File "test.py", line 19, in TestWriteFile
    self.assertTrue(r.ok)
NameError: name 'self' is not defined

I don't think I need to overwrite __init__ function, do I? What's causing this? Why is self not defined? I already declared my superclass unittest.TestCase

Thanks.

I basically learned it from the official sample: Unittest - Basic Example

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3  
That seems hard to believe. Are you 100% sure this is your exact code? –  David Heffernan Mar 2 '12 at 22:46
    
@DavidHeffernan Yes. It is the exact code. So I did try again, with a new file called test2.py and it works. I packaged repoman , and test.py is in the src file. I modified test.py after I created and installed my repoman egg. I think that's the problem. But thanks for the help. Do you guys think that's a problem? If that's actually the problem, I'd edit my title. –  CppLearner Mar 2 '12 at 22:53
1  
No, I don't believe that's your actual code. If self.assertTrue(r.ok) fails then the line before will too. Therefore self.assertTrue(r.ok) won't execute. –  David Heffernan Mar 2 '12 at 22:57
    
@CppLearner. I don't think it has anything to do with the egg. –  Steven Rumbalski Mar 2 '12 at 22:58
    
I am very positive that that was my code. I checked my spelling many times before I came here (I've done that before...so yeah...). One possible reason I thought of was modifying test.py after installing the egg package is bad. –  CppLearner Mar 2 '12 at 23:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't think that what you showed is the actual code that get executed.

I and others belive that, for a couple of reasons:

  • If self.assertTrue(r.ok) fails then the line before will too. Therefore self.assertTrue(r.ok) won't execute. (as David Heffernan said)
  • And because your code looks fine.

I'd say that you probably made a typo of this kind:

def test_scm_permission(self):
                         ^
                         |
         and wrote something here that's not self

In some file that get executed instead of the one you're showing.

Take a look at this example:

# test.py
class MyClass:

    def func(sel):    # typo error here
        self.name = 10


obj = MyClass()
obj.func()

And when I tried to run:

$ python3 test.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test.py", line 8, in <module>
    obj.func()
  File "test.py", line 4, in func
    self.name = 10
NameError: global name 'self' is not defined

Having a traceback similar to yours.

Note: Also if I'm not counting wrong self.assertTrue(r.ok) is on line 18, instead of line 19 (which is the number showed in your traceback).

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2  
I think you're more or less right, but if the typo was there, it would have failed on the line above when it tried to find self.username. –  Thomas K Mar 2 '12 at 23:00
    
@Rik Poggi Okay. I will say "no it is not the exact code" because there a comment before the self.assertTrue(r.ok) But it was properly commented out. Removing it doesn't make it go away. So instead ofsaying it is not, I say it is the same exact code. –  CppLearner Mar 2 '12 at 23:03
    
@CppLearner: So when testing this same code, you get an error right? Can you create an actual, minimal example that shows the issue? –  Niklas B. Mar 2 '12 at 23:04
    
@ThomasK: I agree with you. I don't think the error is coming from that file, but from a typo like that one somewhere. –  Rik Poggi Mar 2 '12 at 23:05
1  
@CppLearner: Try to put two or three print inside that file, and see all of them get executed or none will, etc... Maybe you have another test.py somewhere that get executed instead of the one you're showing. –  Rik Poggi Mar 2 '12 at 23:10

I'm not sure where the problem is coming from -- whether it's a copying error or the wrong test.py is being executed [update: or some mixed tabs-and-spaces issue, I can never figure out when those get flagged and when they don't] -- but the root cause is almost certainly an indentation error.

Note that the error message is

NameError: name 'self' is not defined

and not

NameError: global name 'self' is not defined

which @Rik Poggi got. This is exactly what happens if you move the self.assertTrue one level in/up:

~/coding$ cat test_good_indentation.py
import unittest

class TestWriteFile(unittest.TestCase):
    def test(self):
        """
        Doc goes here.
        """
        self.assertTrue(1)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

~/coding$ python test_good_indentation.py 
.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.000s

OK

versus

~/coding$ cat test_bad_indentation.py
import unittest

class TestWriteFile(unittest.TestCase):
    def test(self):
        """
        Doc goes here.
        """
    self.assertTrue(1)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    unittest.main()

~/coding$ python test_bad_indentation.py 
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "test_bad_indentation.py", line 3, in <module>
    class TestWriteFile(unittest.TestCase):
  File "test_bad_indentation.py", line 8, in TestWriteFile
    self.assertTrue(1)
NameError: name 'self' is not defined
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(+1) Very good observation. –  Rik Poggi Mar 2 '12 at 23:59
    
Nice detective work, sir. –  Niklas B. Mar 3 '12 at 3:31

This is a rewording of David Heffernan's comment.

The code you posted cannot be the cause of that traceback.

Consider these two lines from your code:

r = requests.get("http://192.168.1.138:6666/scm/", auth=(self.username, self.password))
self.assertTrue(r.ok)

The traceback says the error (NameError: name 'self' is not defined) occurs on the second line (self.assertTrue(r.ok)). However, this cannot have been the case because the first line refers to self. If self were not defined, we would not get past the first line.

Therefore, the code you posted is not the code you ran.

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