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I'm currently doing my best to learn jQuery and have created the code below. All it does is remove and change a class at particular points on the page. My question is though, how much will this code affect performance as I am conscious that on every single mouse scroll, the statements will be run or is this negligible.

I appreciate any help offered.

My Code:

function removeActive() {
    $('#vtop ul li').each(function () {
        $(this).children('a').removeClass('active');
    });
}
$(window).scroll(function () {
    var pos = $(window).scrollTop();
    if (pos <= '521') {
        removeActive();
        $('#m-intro a').addClass('active');
    } else if (pos >= '1108' && pos <= '1626') {
        removeActive();
        $('#m-nosales a').addClass('active');
    } else if (pos >= '2220' && pos <= '2742') {
        removeActive();
        $('#m-crates a').addClass('active');
    } else if (pos >= '3332' && pos <= '3860') {
        removeActive();
        $('#m-packages a').addClass('active');
    } else if (pos >= '4444' && pos <= '4966') {
        removeActive();
        $('#m-signup a').addClass('active');
    } else if (pos >= '5556') {
        removeActive();
        $('#m-contact a').addClass('active');
    }
    $('#divd').text(pos);
});
share|improve this question
    
have you, say, opened up the page that this jquery is running on and scrolled up and down to see if the performance hit is negligible or not? I think that would be more reliable than asking us. –  Alexander Corwin Mar 2 '12 at 22:46
    
Yes I did try that and it was fine. But, as there are more than one computer in the world I was looking for a generalization as to how many statements were too much, or if I was worrying over nothing. Thanks though. –  jhodgson4 Mar 2 '12 at 23:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would add a state that makes sure you aren't checking when you don't need to. Otherwise, every pixel that falls in one of your regions will clear and set the active state. That is more expensive than doing some simple bounds checks. Also, do the state comparison first, because it is more likely to be false.

function removeActive() {
    $('#vtop ul li > a').removeClass('active');
}

var active = '';
$(window).scroll(function () {
    var pos = $(window).scrollTop();
    if (active != 'intro' && pos <= '521') {
        removeActive();
        active = 'intro';
        $('#m-intro a').addClass('active');
    } else if (active != 'nosales' && pos >= '1108' && pos <= '1626') {
        removeActive();
        active = 'nosales';
        $('#m-nosales a').addClass('active');
    } else if (active != 'crates' && pos >= '2220' && pos <= '2742') {
        removeActive();
        active = 'crates';
        $('#m-crates a').addClass('active');
    } else if (active != 'packages' && pos >= '3332' && pos <= '3860') {
        removeActive();
        active = 'packages';
        $('#m-packages a').addClass('active');
    } else if (active != 'signup' && pos >= '4444' && pos <= '4966') {
        removeActive();
        active = 'signup';
        $('#m-signup a').addClass('active');
    } else if (active != 'contact' && pos >= '5556') {
        removeActive();
        active = 'contact';
        $('#m-contact a').addClass('active');
    } else if (active != '') {
        active = '';
    }
    $('#divd').text(pos);
});

You could also simplify a litte:

var active = '';
var prevActive = '';

$(window).scroll(function () {
    var pos = $(window).scrollTop();
    if (pos <= 521) {
        active = 'intro';
    } else if (pos <= 1107) {
        active = '';
    } else if (pos <= 1626) {
        active = 'nosales';
    } else if (pos <= 2219) {
        active = '';
    } else if (pos <= 2742) {
        active = 'crates';
    } else if (pos <= 3331) {
        active = '';
    } else if (pos <= 3860) {
        active = 'packages';
    } else if (pos <= 4443) {
        active = '';
    } else if (pos <= 4966) {
        active = 'signup';
    } else if (pos <= 5555) {
        active = '';
    } else {
        active = 'contact';
    }

    if(active != prevActive) {
        $('#vtop ul li > a').removeClass('active');
        if(active != '') {
            $('#m-'+active+' a').addClass('active');
        }
        prevActive = active;
    }

    $('#divd').text(pos);
});

I hacked together an example that does a similar thing. It doesn't have the same html structure, but it shows the scroll behavior:

http://jsfiddle.net/z7YHX/

share|improve this answer
    
I can't see how the variable is checked, to me it looks like it gets set too late? –  jhodgson4 Mar 2 '12 at 23:26
    
The point is, the first time through, it won't be set. You then set it for the range you are in, i.e. 'intro'. That means that when you scroll down 1 pixel, it won't check the 'intro' range again, because you are already there. This prevents you from scrolling down 1 pixel, clearing the active state, setting it the the same item, and then doing it all again. In your 'intro' range you could end up clearing/setting active 520 times! Doing this, you only do it once until you leave the range. –  Jeff B Mar 2 '12 at 23:30
    
That's fantastic and I understand which is a bonus. I can tell its more efficient because there is no jerkiness, where as before I could see a little. Still work in progress but here is the site its working on if you want to take a look surebill.co.uk ..Thanks again for your input –  jhodgson4 Mar 2 '12 at 23:44
    
The last edit removes the class active too soon where as the previous one added the class active just as the <section> went out of view. –  jhodgson4 Mar 3 '12 at 0:11
    
Yeah, I realized that the first example is actually flawed (but was away from my computer), because the inactive regions are not called out in the if-else, which means everything falls in to the else at the bottom once it is set... Does the second example work? –  Jeff B Mar 3 '12 at 6:31
$('#vtop ul li').each(function(){
    $(this).children('a').removeClass('active');
});

can be simplified to

$('#vtop ul li > a').removeClass('active');

As far as the if statements in the scroll event, I don't see anything wrong with it or that would cause a serious slowdown.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah right ok, so the '>' will select all child elements specified, that's great. Is there a limit to how many statements is too much in your experience? Thanks again –  jhodgson4 Mar 2 '12 at 22:47
    
Well, In a non-mobile environment, no there isn't a realistic limit that you will hit. It does cause a slowdown in IE though if you use a lot of ,'s in your selector. In a mobile environment, however, you want to avoid text selectors as much as possible because it is more efficient to use direct selectors. For example, $("#vtop").children().children().children().removeClass('active'); –  Kevin B Mar 2 '12 at 22:52
    
I tend to stick with the path that is the easiest to read and/or maintain rather than going for the absolute fastest selectors. –  Kevin B Mar 2 '12 at 22:54
    
Thanks, you've been a great help –  jhodgson4 Mar 2 '12 at 23:02
    
More expensive than this is the fact that you call removeActive any time that you fall in one of your regions, even if you already set active correctly for that region. –  Jeff B Mar 2 '12 at 23:07

Don't know about performance but something like this it's easier to read. Haven't tried it but you get the idea...Another option would be to use a switch statement instead.

var elms = {
    intro: { min: 0, max: 521 },
    nosales: { min: 1108, max: 1626 },
    crates: { min: 2220, max: 2742 },
    packages: { min: 3332, max: 3860 },
    signup: { min: 4444, max: 4966 },
    contact: { min: 5556, max: $(window).height() }
};
$(window).scroll(function () {
    var pos = $(window).scrollTop();
    for (var el in elms) {
        var min = elms[el].min,
            max = elms[el].max;
        if (pos >= min && pos <= max) {
            $('#vtop ul li > a').removeClass('active');
            $('#m-' + elms[el]).addClass('active');
            break;
        }
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
pos needs to be determined inside $(window).scroll ? –  James Westgate Mar 2 '12 at 23:07
    
yup, you're right, fixed. –  elclanrs Mar 2 '12 at 23:18

Its good code, but I think there is a more maintainable way of writing this code - using an object literal - that will also result in a smaller download.

var bands = {
    intro: [0,521], 
    nosales:[1108,1626], 
    crates:[2220,2742], 
    packages:[3332,3860],
    signup: [4444, 4966],
    contact: [5556, 99999]};

var win = $(window); //Cache for speed

win.scroll(function () {
    var pos = win.scrollTop();

    for (var key in bands) {
        var band = bands[key];
        if (pos >= band[0] && pos <= band[1]) {
            $('#vtop ul li > a').removeClass('active');
            $('#m-' + key + ' a').addClass('active');
            break;
        }
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Looking up for loops now to try and understand this... –  jhodgson4 Mar 2 '12 at 23:27
    
Yeah, I think this is the way to go. I posted a similar solution. –  elclanrs Mar 2 '12 at 23:56

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