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I'm new to sed and I have the following question. In this example:

some text here
blah blah 123
another new line
some other text as well
another line

I want to delete all lines except those that contain either string 'text' and or string 'blah', so my output file looks like this:

some text here
blah blah 123
some other text as well

Any hints how this can be done using sed?

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2  
Must the answer use sed? grep would do this very easily. –  Tim Mar 2 '12 at 23:48

3 Answers 3

This might work for you:

sed '/text\|blah/!d' file
some text here
blah blah 123
some other text as well
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Thanks, that works. –  user1246172 Mar 4 '12 at 22:04
1  
How can I for example specify that text or blah could only appear in the last column ? –  lovedynasty May 14 '14 at 12:27
    
@lovedynasty If you mean at the end of line, you should use $: '/text$\|blah$/!d' –  Melebius Feb 12 at 11:58

You want to print only those lines which match either 'text' or 'blah' (or both), where the distinction between 'and' and 'or' is rather crucial.

sed -n -e '/text/{p;n;}' -e '/blah/{p;n;}' your_data_file

The -n means don't print by default. The first pattern searches for 'text', prints it if matched and skips to the next line; the second pattern does the same for 'blah'. If the 'n' was not there then a line containing 'text and blah' would be printed twice. Although I could have use just -e '/blah/p', the symmetry is better, especially if you need to extend the list of matched words.

If your version of sed supports extended regular expressions (for example, GNU sed does, with -r), then you can simplify that to:

sed -r -n -e '/text|blah/p' your_data_file
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2  
If sed does not support -r it probably won't support {} either. This should work with older seds: sed '/text\|blah/!d' file –  glenn jackman Mar 3 '12 at 1:10
    
The { ... } grouping of commands was in 7th Edition UNIX version of sed; I can't think how you'd come across a version where that was not suppported. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 3 '12 at 3:10

You could simply do it through awk,

$ awk '/blah|text/' file
some text here
blah blah 123
some other text as well
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