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trying to learn and practice arrays but I have a problem with this small example. Can someone please help me please? Thank you

public class Homework1{
public static void main(String[] args){
    int[] anArray={ 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};

    System.out.println(anArray.length);
    int min=0;
    int max=0;

    for(int i=0; i<anArray.length; i++){
        if(anArray[i].compareTo(anArray[min]) < 0)
            min=i;

        if(anArray[i].compareTo(anArray[max]) > 0)
            max=i;
    }

    System.out.println(max);
    System.out.println(min);
}
}

And I am getting this error message:

int cannot be dereferenced
        if(anArray[i].compareTo(anArray[min]) < 0)
int cannot be dereferenced
        if(anArray[i].compareTo(anArray[max]) > 0)

Thank you.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

CompareTo will not work with Premitive type. You can use comparator operator.

public class TestArray  {

public static void main(String[] args)  {
int[] anArray={ 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};

System.out.println(anArray.length);
int min=0;
int max=0;

for(int i=0; i<anArray.length; i++){
    if(anArray[i] <(anArray[min]) )
        min=i;

    if(anArray[i]>(anArray[max]) )
        max=i;
}

System.out.println(max);
System.out.println(min);
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, thank you very much Mr. –  Bart g Mar 3 '12 at 0:17

The type of the expression anArray[i] is int. int is a primitive type, which means it's not a "real" object. You can't call methods (like compareTo()) on primitive types.

However, you can call methods on the type Integer, which is the "boxing" type that corresponds to int. (Boxing types are types you use as wrappers for primitive types when you need to treat them as objects.)

Just use the regular comparison operators for integral types:

if (anArray[i] < anArray[min]) {
    //...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, exactly that is what I am doing right now. Thank you –  Bart g Mar 3 '12 at 0:26
    
To clarify, the main reason one might need to treat a primitive as an object is for use with generics (e.g. ArrayList<Integer>). Java's generic type system does not allow primitives (unlike C++ templates), and since generics weren't an original feature, they decided to use primitive datatypes (in contrast to, for example, Ruby, where numeric constants are just instances of numeric classes (e.g. 4 is an instance of the FixNum class)). –  jpm Mar 13 '12 at 15:25
    
@jpm Aren't Ruby's FixNums kind of special? I seem to recall they're implemented as tagged object handles, so you actually use the "primitive" value, but the interpreter handles them specially to make them behave like real objects. –  millimoose Mar 13 '12 at 17:46
    
@Inerdial That's quite possible. I haven't really looked into the implementation, but even so, that would seem to just be an optimization. The net effect is approximately the same for the developer, though. –  jpm Mar 13 '12 at 17:51

In Java, ints are not objects, and thus comparison is done with via operators (<, >, ==, etc.). If you want to use compareTo, you'll have to use and array of Integers.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice comment, I am writing it down. –  Bart g Mar 3 '12 at 0:27

You probably need to specifically cast / box your int to an Integer in order to use compareTo.

E.g.

if (((Integer)anArray[i]).compareTo(anArray[min]) < 0)

But as stated in another answer, you probably want to just do the comparison directly on the int using the standard operators <, >, etc, instead of using compareTo at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, I will do that thank you very much for for help. –  Bart g Mar 3 '12 at 0:46

The int is a primitive type and as such cannot be dereferenced. Only reference types can be dereferenced. The dot (.) is the dereferencing operator. You are attempting to treat the primitive int like an object. You can use the comparison operators such as < and > and == to compare primitive integers.

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Thank you, your comments are so important, I am writing it down. –  Bart g Mar 3 '12 at 0:23

I think you're trying to find the minimal and maximal value, anArray[min] or anArray[max] in this case are useless, as you get the value of the min/max index. the correct way of doing this is:

if(anArray[i]>max)
    max = anArray[i];

if(anArray[i]<min)
    min = anArray[i];
share|improve this answer
    
deferenciation means treating a data type as an object, int is not an object, Integer is. –  Shingetsu Mar 2 '12 at 23:53
    
Thank you for your help. –  Bart g Mar 3 '12 at 0:22

To use the method compareTo() make your array an Integer list, not primitive int list. Change this line

int[] anArray={1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};

to this line:

Integer[] anArray={1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9};

Compiling errors will disappear.

share|improve this answer
    
He isn't calling compareTo() on the array, but instead, the int elements of the array. –  jpm Mar 2 '12 at 23:51
    
@jpm review my answer. –  Juvanis Mar 2 '12 at 23:52
    
hu! interesting, I thought that 'int' and 'Integer' would do exactly the same thing. Thank you –  Bart g Mar 3 '12 at 0:21
    
@Bartg review your accepted answer, if this is better for you. –  Juvanis Mar 3 '12 at 5:34

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