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Apologies if this is obvious, I'm new to C++. There seem to be related answers on stackoverflow, just not those I understand enough to apply in my case.

I have a list of class instances that represent visual patches. When the distance between features is below a threshold I would like to merge those items, replacing parents with the merged output.

Something like this:

  1. Loop through all items using a nested for loop (to compare each item to every other item)

  2. When a match is found (that is not the same instance):

    1. Construct a new (child) instance from the matching pair, append to new list.

    2. erase both (parent) items from the list

  3. Continue iterating through the list finding other matches

  4. Append the new list to the original list.

I know how to erase items from the list in a single for loop using iterators, but its unclear to me how it would work in a nested loop due to erase() incrementing to the next item.

I may also need to make this function recursive as eventually the merging should reduce the list to a set of representative instances by merging merges.

Suggestions would be appreciated.

Following is my attempt, which does not work (the nested loops interfere with one and other). What is the proper way to do this kind of pairwise comparison of elements in a list?

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

int main() {
list<int> mylist;
list<int>::iterator mylistiterOutter;
list<int>::iterator mylistiterInner;

for(int i=0; i<10; i++) {
    mylist.push_back(i);
    cout << i << endl;
}

for(int i=0; i<10; i++) {
    mylist.push_back(i);
    cout << i << endl;
}

int counter =0;
for(mylistiterOutter = mylist.begin(); mylistiterOutter != mylist.end();) {
    cout << "Size of mylist: " << mylist.size() << endl;

    for(mylistiterInner = mylist.begin(); mylistiterInner != mylist.end();) {
        cout << "mylistiterInner: " << *mylistiterInner << endl;
        cout << "mylistiterOutter: " << *mylistiterOutter << endl;
        //if (mylistiterOutter == mylistiterInner) {// match!
        if (false) {
            //mylistiterOutter = mylist.erase(mylistiterOutter);
            //mylistiterInner = mylist.erase(mylistiterInner);
        } else {
            mylistiterOutter++;
            mylistiterInner++;
        }

        counter++;
    }
}
cout << endl << "Size of mylist: " << mylist.size() << endl << "NumIterations: " << counter << endl;

return(0);
}

Thanks @lalitm. I tried your approach first because it is closer to what I had originally envisioned, but J.N.'s proposal is more elegant so I'll try that also. Unfortunately I was unable to make @lalitm's approach work. (leads to segmentation fault). Following is slightly more complex code that includes sample class, and merging code, using @lalitm's approach:

#include <iostream>
#include <list>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;

class percepUnit {
public:
    int cx, cy; // location of percept in frame
    bool remove; // used to delete percepts

    // constructor method
    percepUnit(int ix, int iy) {
        cx = ix;
        cy = iy;
        remove = false;
    }
};

bool canMerge(percepUnit unitA, percepUnit unitB) {

    double dist = sqrt(pow(abs(unitA.cx-unitB.cx),2)+ pow(abs(unitA.cy-unitB.cy),2));
    return (dist < 3);
}

percepUnit merge(percepUnit unitA, percepUnit unitB) {
    int x,y;

    x = unitA.cx+unitB.cx/2;
    y = unitA.cy+unitB.cy/2;

    return (percepUnit(x,y));
}

int main() {
    list<percepUnit> mylist;
    list<percepUnit> mergedlist;
    list<percepUnit>::iterator mylistiterOutter;
    list<percepUnit>::iterator mylistiterInner;
    bool mylistiterOutterChanged;

    mylist.push_back(percepUnit(0,0));
    mylist.push_back(percepUnit(2,2));

    mylist.push_back(percepUnit(5,5));
    mylist.push_back(percepUnit(7,7));

    //cout << "merge front/back? " << canMerge(mylist.front(),mylist.back()) << endl;
    //percepUnit test = merge(mylist.front(),mylist.back());
    //cout << "merged front/back (x,y): " << test.cx << "," << test.cy << endl;

    for(mylistiterOutter = mylist.begin(); mylistiterOutter != mylist.end();) {
    cout << "Size of mylist: " << mylist.size() << endl;

        mylistiterInner = mylistiterOutter;
        mylistiterOutterChanged = false;

        for (++mylistiterInner; mylistiterInner != mylist.end();) {
            if (canMerge(*mylistiterOutter, *mylistiterInner )) {
                mergedlist.push_back(merge(*mylistiterOutter, *mylistiterInner));
                mylistiterOutter = mylist.erase(mylistiterOutter);
                mylistiterInner = mylist.erase(mylistiterInner);
                mylistiterOutterChanged = true;
            } else {
               ++mylistiterInner;
            }
        }
        if (!mylistiterOutterChanged) {
            ++mylistiterOutter;
        }
    }

    mylist.splice(mylist.end(), mergedlist);


    return(0);
}

Here is my gdb info:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x00007ffff7b31d97 in std::_List_node_base::unhook() ()
   from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6
(gdb) bt
#0  0x00007ffff7b31d97 in std::_List_node_base::unhook() ()
   from /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6
#1  0x0000000000401786 in std::list<percepUnit, std::allocator<percepUnit> >::_M_erase (this=0x7fffffffe4d0, __position=...)
at /usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/stl_list.h:1424
#2  0x000000000040153d in std::list<percepUnit, std::allocator<percepUnit> >::erase (this=0x7fffffffe4d0, __position=...)
at /usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/list.tcc:111
#3  0x0000000000401130 in main () at debug.cpp:61

Still no luck. I think the problem could be that the code above does not test if the two iterators are pointing at the same item in the list, and therefore that messes up the iterators (incrementing or not when they should not be).

How can I test if both iterators point at the same item? (without the brute force of comparing all the class members?, but then two copies of the same instance are not the same instance.)

share|improve this question
    
So, are you basically looking for a way to find the intersection of two lists? I do not understand step 4. Which list are you appending your newly constructed list too? –  noMAD Mar 3 '12 at 0:08
    
The best method would depend entirelly on what you're going to use as datastructure. But simply said: erase() will return an iterator you can use for the next loop execution. (it returns the iterator first after the removed elements). –  paul23 Mar 3 '12 at 0:41
    
@noMAD: the first list is the list of existing instances. The second list is the list of newly constructed instances from instances in the first list. Once instances are removed from the first list, then the new list of newly constructed instances can be appended. (I can use parent/child descriptions here if that is easier, though there is no graph.) Its not an intersection because there is only one list. –  b.. Mar 7 '12 at 1:02
    
@paul23: I'm using an STL::list and that seems to make the most sense for this application (fast removal and insertion, and no random access needed). I am aware that erase() returns the iterator to the next element, but since there are two loops over the same list, I'm unclear about how this would work. If there is a match then there would always be two erases (one for each 'parent') if there is no match then how to increment only the inner loop? Any example of using iterators and erase() in a nested for loop would be useful. –  b.. Mar 7 '12 at 1:03
    
@b.. show us some code then –  paul23 Mar 7 '12 at 1:24

4 Answers 4

You didn't provide much insight yet, but here is a nice way of doing it:

#include <algorithm>
#include <set>

std::list<int> myList = {5,6,7,7,8,5};
std::set<int> uniques; // a set can only contain unique elements

// copying the list in the set will overwrite the same elements when duplicates are found
std::copy(myList.begin(), myList.end(), std::inserter(uniques, uniques.begin()));

// clear the existing list
myList.clear();

// copy back the unique elements.
std::copy(uniques.begin(), uniques.end(), std::back_inserter(myList));

for (int i: myList)
    cout << i << endl;

EDIT : performance wise it should be comparable to your solution or faster because I the searching in the set is done using a 0(log(N)) algorithm, while you have two loops.

EDIT2 : you need something that's a bit more complex than what I thought. One starting piece of advice though: you can't loop with iterators and modify the container you are iterating on at the same time. You'll need to use integer indexes.

EDIT3 : The solution below provides a way using unordered_set. You need to be able to discrimate the objects belonging to the same "groups".

#include <unordered_set>

// That's the objects we are going to "fuse"
// In this example I suppose that  all Points that have the same X must be fused
struct Point
{
    double x;
    double y;

    // We need a way to say that which points are equals
    bool operator==(const Point& other) const
    {
        return other.x == x;
    }
};

// Then we need a unique identifier to place the points in a set
namespace std {
    template <> struct hash<Point> {
        double operator()(const Point& point) const {
            return point.x;
        }
    };
}

// We will use an unordered_set to put our elements in
unordered_set<Point> uniques;

// Then we can proceed as before
std::copy(myList.begin(), myList.end(), std::inserter(uniques, uniques.begin()));
myList.clear();
std::copy(uniques.begin(), uniques.end(), std::back_inserter(myList));
share|improve this answer
    
I'm trying to do this with a list of instances, not a list of ints (that is just an easy example case). There will be no unique values, merges will be determined when two instances have members that are within a certain threshold (clustering). The constructed instances will be an average of the two matching parents. It is not the matching logic I need help with, but how to make a nested loop work with iterators and erase. As the items being processed are complex class instances. I see no simple short way of doing this without a brute force nested loop for each item over every item. –  b.. Mar 8 '12 at 16:48
    
This probably can be implemented in the same way with a custom operator== –  J.N. Mar 8 '12 at 21:45
    
If can go with code as elegant as you suggest here by using a custom == operator that would be ideal. Any recommendations (tutorials) on how to create a custom == for my class? How would this relate to the possible recursive requirement for the first pass of merges being merged in a second (and onwards) pass? –  b.. Mar 9 '12 at 2:37
    
I was trying to do so, but didn't succeed before leaving for work this morning, not simple as I thought. Sorry :(. I have more advice though, but it'll have to wait a bit. –  J.N. Mar 9 '12 at 2:41
    
Could you for instance, produce a unique integer or string code for each set of equivalent structures ? –  J.N. Mar 9 '12 at 2:43

I think that modifying (erasing) the list inside nested loop is a bad idea. The outer loop iterator (mylistiterOutter from your example code) will not work properly.

You should make two separate loops. The first one should search for the items to be merged and somehow remember them (without erasing). The second loop would then erase the remembered items and create the new ones.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Wacek. I decided it does make sense to take erase out of the loop, and just mark deletions in class members and use remove_if. I can't even get the nested loop part to work properly though. I'm about to put another edit above. –  b.. Mar 15 '12 at 20:57
void mergeObjects(std::list<T>& list)
{
    std::list<T> new_list;
    typedef std::list<T>::iterator Itr;
    for (Itr i=list.begin(); i != list.end();)
    {
        Itr j=i;
        bool is_merged = false;
        for (++j; j != list.end();)
        {
            if (isMergeable(*i, *j))
            {
                T merged = mergeObj(*i, *j);
                new_list.push_back(merged);
                list.erase(j);
                is_merged = true;
                break;
            }
            else
            {
                ++j;
            }
        }
        if (is_merged)
        {
            i = list.erase(i); 
        }
        else
        {
            ++i;
        }
    }
    list.splice(list.end(), new_list);
}

This should work since inserting and deleting elements does not invalidate any pointers, references and iterator to any other elements. [Ref: The C++ STL Tutorial and Reference, Nikolai Josuttis]

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, please see my edits above. –  b.. Mar 10 '12 at 21:25
    
@b.. - the above code needs to include some more checks on Itr i since erasures on i are happening inside loop for j. See edits above. –  lalitm Mar 11 '12 at 4:11
    
still no luck, the added check did not change the segfault. One thing I noticed trying to debug is that there is no check for when the same item in the list is compared to itself, which seems to mess things up. I can't quite get my head around how to fix that though (just a hunch its the problem). I'm not even sure how to test if the two iterators are pointing to the same item in the list... –  b.. Mar 12 '12 at 23:52
    
Please see my comments above. Also I realized that this loop may be redundant, since each possible pair is looked at twice (A=B and B=A) how can this redundancy be removed? Additionally once things are getting to this level of complexity am I benefiting from using iterators, or should I simply keep track of two int loops? –  b.. Mar 13 '12 at 20:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Following is what I ended up with.

  1. It's ragged: pairs are not compared twice (0,1 and 1,0)

  2. instances are not compared to themselves (0,0)

    #include <iostream>
    #include <list>
    #include <cmath>
    #include <algorithm>
    using namespace std;
    
    class percepUnit {
        public:
            int cx, cy; // location of percept in frame
            bool remove; // used to delete percepts
    
            // constructor method
            percepUnit(int ix, int iy) {
                cx = ix;
                cy = iy;
                remove = false;
            }
    };
    
    bool canMerge(percepUnit unitA, percepUnit unitB) {
    
        double dist = sqrt(pow(abs(unitA.cx-unitB.cx),2)+ pow(abs(unitA.cy-unitB.cy),2));
        return (dist < 3);
    }
    
    percepUnit merge(percepUnit unitA, percepUnit unitB) {
        int x,y;
    
        x = unitA.cx+unitB.cx/2;
        y = unitA.cy+unitB.cy/2;
    
        return (percepUnit(x,y));
    }
    
    // Predicate to use remove_if to delete merge inputs.
    bool removePercepsMarkedForRemoval(const percepUnit &unit) {
        return unit.remove;
    }
    
    int main() {
        list<percepUnit> mylist;
        list<percepUnit> mergedlist;
        list<percepUnit>::iterator mylistiterOutter;
        list<percepUnit>::iterator mylistiterInner;
    
        mylist.push_back(percepUnit(0,0));
        mylist.push_back(percepUnit(2,2));
    
        mylist.push_back(percepUnit(5,5));
        mylist.push_back(percepUnit(7,7));
    
        mylist.push_back(percepUnit(15,15));
    
        for(mylistiterOutter = mylist.begin(); mylistiterOutter != mylist.end(); mylistiterOutter++) {
    
            mylistiterInner = mylistiterOutter; // bypass the same pair twice
    
            while (mylistiterInner != mylist.end()) {
                if (canMerge(*mylistiterOutter, *mylistiterInner) and mylistiterOutter != mylistiterInner) { // bypass the same instance
                    mergedlist.push_back(merge(*mylistiterOutter, *mylistiterInner));
                    mylistiterOutter->remove = true;
                    mylistiterInner->remove = true;
                }
                mylistiterInner++;
            }
        }
    
        mylist.erase(remove_if(mylist.begin(), mylist.end(), removePercepsMarkedForRemoval), mylist.end());
    
        mylist.splice(mylist.end(), mergedlist);
    
        return(0);
    }
    
share|improve this answer

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