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If I have an opened file, is there an os call to get the complete path as a string?

f = open('/Users/Desktop/febROSTER2012.xls')

From f, how would I get "/Users/Desktop/febROSTER2012.xls" ?

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up vote 39 down vote accepted

The key here is the name attribute of the f object representing the opened file. You get it like that:

>>> f = open('/Users/Desktop/febROSTER2012.xls')
>>> f.name
'/Users/Desktop/febROSTER2012.xls'

Does it help?

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2  
For files created by: tempfile.TemporaryFile(mode='w', prefix='xxx', suffix='.txt') doesn't work! – Victor Dec 6 '12 at 12:15
6  
@Victor: Please read the documentation of tempfile module, especially for tempfile.NamedTemporaryFile, just below the documentation for tempfile.TemporaryFile you mentioned. This is specific case for temporary file and, as seen in the docs, there is already existing solution. tempfile.TemporaryFile is not meant to be used in case you want to read the name. – Tadeck Dec 6 '12 at 21:12
3  
If you create a file using open('foo.txt', 'w') and then do f.name, it only provides you with the output foo.txt – searchengine27 Jun 16 '15 at 17:04

And if you just want to get the directory name and no need for the filename coming with it, then you can do that in the following conventional way using os Python module.

>>> import os
>>> f = open('/Users/Desktop/febROSTER2012.xls')
>>> os.path.dirname(f.name)
>>> '/Users/Desktop/'

This way you can get hold of the directory structure.

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This returns an empty string if you use f = open('febROSTER2012.xls'). How can you get to the full path? – NZD Feb 29 at 18:34

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