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Suppose a table named 'users', a table named 'posts' and a table named 'ratings', that contains the rating (either a 'like' or 'dislike') of each user towards each post.

create table ratings (
user_id int unsigned not null,
post_id int unsigned not null,
rating set('like','dislike') not null,
primary key (user_id, post_id)
);

Given a post X, I want to select all the posts Y such that no user who rated them both, liked them both. Furthermore, if possible, I would like to order those posts by the amount of common users who rated them, meaning that the post Y with most common 'raters' with X should appear first.

I'd copy what I've done so far, but I think none of it is worth it. Any help appreciated, thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this fiddle. I'm not 100% sure I got what you wanted, but... check with your own data if it fits.

You can also remove the WHERE and add X.post_id AS this_post_id into the FROM to get this for all posts.

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I shouldn't have asked this question so late, I need to sleep now, but as soon as I get up I will try your idea and let you know, it looks great. THANKS! –  Felipe Schenone Mar 3 '12 at 4:54
    
It worked perfectly, many many thanks. –  Felipe Schenone Mar 3 '12 at 14:48

Given a post X, I want to select all the posts Y such that no user who rated them both, liked them both.

Ok, so given the following set of data you expect 5 and 6 when ID = 1 (I understand you don't want to display ID = 1 either):

+---------+---------+---------+
| POST_ID | USER_ID | RATING  |
+---------+---------+---------+
|       1 |       1 | like    | // ID = 1, so remove this post
|       1 |       2 | like    |
|       1 |       3 | like    |
|       1 |       4 | dislike |
|       2 |       1 | like    | // Double like, so remove this post
|       2 |       2 | dislike |
|       2 |       3 | like    |
|       2 |       4 | dislike |
|       3 |       1 | like    | // Double like, so remove this post
|       4 |       1 | dislike |
|       4 |       2 | like    | // Double like, so remove this post
|       5 |       1 | dislike |
|       5 |       2 | dislike |
|       5 |       5 | dislike |
|       6 |       1 | dislike |
+---------+---------+---------+

This query will give you that:

select distinct post_id from ratings r3
where r3.post_id not in (
  select r2.post_id from ratings r1
  join ratings r2
  on r1.post_id <> r2.post_id and r1.user_id = r2.user_id
  where (r1.post_id = 1 or r2.post_id = 1) and r1.rating = 'like' and r2.rating = 'like'
)

If you also want them sorted by the common raters both have, then run this query:

select post_id from ratings r3
where r3.post_id not in (
  select r2.post_id from ratings r1
  join ratings r2
  on r1.post_id <> r2.post_id and r1.user_id = r2.user_id
  where (r1.post_id = 1 or r2.post_id = 1) and r1.rating = 'like' and r2.rating = 'like'
) and r3.user_id in (
  select user_id from ratings
  where post_id = 1
)
group by post_id
order by count(*) desc

Here is an example

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Will miss cases where r2 = like and r1 = dislike, and where both are dislike. Also, you don't need to check for r1.user_id <> r2.user_id since, being primary key, they would resolve to the same row; and one row can't be both like and dislike at the same time. –  Amadan Mar 3 '12 at 6:32
    
To be honest I don't get your comment. Each row will be traversed and compared agains all the others for different users so there won't be any miss. I agree with you on the extra condition but actually it would be faster to compare user_ids agains each other than ratings agains each other. Can you provide a set of data in which this query provides a wrong answer? –  Mosty Mostacho Mar 3 '12 at 6:39
    
I didn't notice you looked up all the rows. OP's request had "given a post X", so you need to collect both r1 and r2 in your case, since they're not symmetric. Anyway, there is the bad case in the previous comment: a user rating both r1 and r2 as dislike should be in the answer, but you disallow it. –  Amadan Mar 3 '12 at 7:09
2  
Because the previous answer worked, I didn't test yours, but it seems ok, and I took your strategy of ordering by count() instead of selecting the count with an alias like the other answer did, so a well deserved +1, thanks! –  Felipe Schenone Mar 3 '12 at 14:54

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