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Iam writing unit tests for my repository and I need to test repository method with delegate.

First of all part from repository interface

public interface IRepository<T>
{
    ...
    IQueryable<T> All();
    ...
}

and here is the method what I want to test. I do it as an extension method for IRepository<RentDetails>

public static bool AnyIntersectionForRoomWithDatesExists
(this IRepository<RentDetails> repository, Room room, DateTime startDate, 
DateTime terminationDate)
{
var rent = repository.All().Where(
r =>
(r.BeginningDate <= startDate && r.TerminationDate > terminationDate &&
          r.TerminationDate < terminationDate) ||
(r.BeginningDate > startDate) ||
(r.TerminationDate >= terminationDate && r.BeginningDate > startDate &&
          r.BeginningDate < terminationDate));
        }

In my unit tests I created an IEnumerable<RentDetails> collection

IEnumerable<RentDetails> rentDetailsColection = new List<RentDetails>
{
new RentDetails(TenantTestHelper.ValidTenant,roomMoq, new DateTime(2012, 1, 1),new DateTime(2012, 2, 1)),
new RentDetails(TenantTestHelper.ValidTenant,roomMoq, new DateTime(2012, 3, 1),new DateTime(2012, 7, 1)),
new RentDetails(TenantTestHelper.ValidTenant,roomMoq, new DateTime(2012, 10, 1),DateTime.MaxValue)
};

but I have a problem how to setup the repository moq? I tryed the following

[Test]
var reqestStartDate = new DateTime(2012, 4, 1);
var requestTerminationDate = reqestStartDate.AddDays(30);

...

rentDetailsRepositoryMoq.Setup(c => c.All().Where(r =>
(r.BeginningDate <= reqestStartDate &&
r.TerminationDate > requestTerminationDate &&
r.TerminationDate < requestTerminationDate) ||
(r.BeginningDate > reqestStartDate) ||
(r.TerminationDate >= requestTerminationDate &&
r.BeginningDate > reqestStartDate &&
r.BeginningDate < requestTerminationDate)))
.Returns((IQueryable<RentDetails>)rentDetailsColection
.Where(r =>(r.BeginningDate <= reqestStartDate &&
r.TerminationDate > requestTerminationDate &&
r.TerminationDate < requestTerminationDate) ||
(r.BeginningDate > reqestStartDate) ||
(r.TerminationDate >= requestTerminationDate &&
r.BeginningDate > reqestStartDate && r.BeginningDate < requestTerminationDate)));

but I have got an exception

NotSupportedException

Expression references a method that does not belong to the mocked object: c => c.All().Where(r => (((r.BeginningDate <= .reqestStartDate && r.TerminationDate > .requestTerminationDate) && r.TerminationDate < .requestTerminationDate) || r.BeginningDate > .reqestStartDate) || ((r.TerminationDate >= .requestTerminationDate && r.BeginningDate > .reqestStartDate) && r.BeginningDate < .requestTerminationDate))

share|improve this question
    
Edit your code and add line breaks so it doesn't have a horizontal scroll. All that code is hard to read like that. –  gideon Mar 3 '12 at 8:02
1  
I'd stub All() to just return a list of fake data converted to an IQueryable() (i.e .Returns(rentDetailsColection.ToQueryable()) ). If you need to jump through hoops to setup unit tests like you do there's something wrong going on. I wouldn't verify if the method calls all those methods on the data source. It's tedious and will make you stop testing altogether in the long wrong because it's too much work to maintain. –  Andre Loker Mar 3 '12 at 8:14
1  
(cont'd): If you've set up the test as I suggest, you'd only need to test the outcome of the method. If all the method does is returning the result of the call to the repository, there's no need to test the method. Test the methods of the IQueryable that your repository returns instead. If it returns something your ORM (like EF) returns, don't test it at all. It's outside of your applications code. –  Andre Loker Mar 3 '12 at 8:19
    
thanks for reply. Basicaly Iam trying to test method AnyIntersectionForRoomWithDatesExists() (because of query logic). Your hint with All and AsQueryable helped. –  Ivan Mar 3 '12 at 8:24
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just Setup the IRepository.All() to return a IQueryable<T> and assert that the unit under test is doing what it is supposed to be doing. Note that by conventional definitions, you are trying to Stub the repository and you will be asserting the state.

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This is the way to do it. I tend to keep a FakeRepository<T> : IRepository<T> in my unit test project so i only have to do this once. It takes a Hashset<T> in the constructor so makes it trvivial to write tests. –  Frans Mar 3 '12 at 8:38
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