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public class Utils {

    public static List<Message> getMessages() {

    //File file = new File("file:///android_asset/helloworld.txt");

    AssetManager assetManager = getAssets();
    InputStream ims = assetManager.open("helloworld.txt");

     }
}

I am using this code trying to read a file from assets. I tried two ways to do this. First, when use File I received FileNotFoundException, when using AssetManager getAssets() method isn't recognized. Is there any solution here?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 27 down vote accepted
getAssets()

is only works in Activity in other any class you have to use Context for it.

Make a constructor for Utils class pass reference of activity (ugly way) or context of application as a parameter to it. Using that use getAsset() in your Utils class.

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It works on anything that's a subclass of Context, of which Activity is one of many. –  fiXedd Aug 22 '13 at 20:59
    
Just noted I have written Context. –  user370305 Aug 23 '13 at 7:43

Here is what i do in an activity for buffered reading extend/modify to match your needs

BufferedReader reader = null;
try {
    reader = new BufferedReader(
        new InputStreamReader(getAssets().open("filename.txt")));

    // do reading, usually loop until end of file reading  
    String mLine = reader.readLine();
    while (mLine != null) {
       //process line
       ...
       mLine = reader.readLine(); 
    }
} catch (IOException e) {
    //log the exception
} finally {
    if (reader != null) {
         try {
             reader.close();
         } catch (IOException e) {
             //log the exception
         }
    }
}

EDIT : My answer is perhaps useless if your question is on how to do it outside of an activity. If your question is simply how to read a file from asset then the answer is above.

UPDATE :

To open a file specifying the type simply add the type in the InputStreamReader call as follow.

BufferedReader reader = null;
try {
    reader = new BufferedReader(
        new InputStreamReader(getAssets().open("filename.txt"), "UTF-8")); 

    // do reading, usually loop until end of file reading 
    String mLine = reader.readLine();
    while (mLine != null) {
       //process line
       ...
       mLine = reader.readLine(); 
    }
} catch (IOException e) {
    //log the exception
} finally {
    if (reader != null) {
         try {
             reader.close();
         } catch (IOException e) {
             //log the exception
         }
    }
}

EDIT

As @Stan says in the comment, the code I am giving is not summing up lines. mLine is replaced every pass. That's why I wrote //process line. I assume the file contains some sort of data (i.e a contact list) and each line should be processed separately.

In case you simply want to load the file without any kind of processing you will have to sum up mLine at each pass using StringBuilder() and appending each pass.

ANOTHER EDIT

According to the comment of @Vincent I added the finally block.

Also note that in Java 7 and upper you can use try-with-resources to use the AutoCloseable and Closeable features of recent Java.

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This code fails cuz it gonna replace contents of mLine every pass –  Stan Jan 16 at 18:38
2  
@Stan, then write about it in the comments and let the author to decide if they'd like to update it. Edits are for improving clarity, not changing meaning. Code revisions should always be posted as comments first. –  KyleMit Jan 16 at 18:39
    
Ok, I got it, thanx! Its good you'd mentioned about functionality in EDIT. Im gonna remove this my comment soon as unconstructive etc. Also I voted up your comment above –  Stan Jan 17 at 10:36
1  
Your code doesn't guaranty to close the stream and free the resource in a timely manner. I recommend you to use finally {reader.close();}. –  Vincent Apr 10 at 4:17
1  
I think it's useful to point out that the code above shows an error in ADT - the "reader.close();" line needs to be put in another try-catch block. Check this thread: stackoverflow.com/questions/8981589/… :) –  JakeP Jul 7 at 10:36
public String ReadFromfile(String fileName, Context context) {
    StringBuilder returnString = new StringBuilder();
    InputStream fIn = null;
    InputStreamReader isr = null;
    BufferedReader input = null;
    try {
        fIn = context.getResources().getAssets()
                .open(fileName, Context.MODE_WORLD_READABLE);
        isr = new InputStreamReader(fIn);
        input = new BufferedReader(isr);
        String line = "";
        while ((line = input.readLine()) != null) {
            returnString.append(line);
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.getMessage();
    } finally {
        try {
            if (isr != null)
                isr.close();
            if (fIn != null)
                fIn.close();
            if (input != null)
                input.close();
        } catch (Exception e2) {
            e2.getMessage();
        }
    }
    return returnString.toString();
}
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You would think that if you close the BufferedReader, than it would have to automatically close the InputStreanReader and InputStream too. Because what it you don't create a handle for those, e.g. input = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(fIn));. –  trans May 28 at 13:07

Better late than never.

I had difficulties reading files line by line in some circumstances. The method below is the best I found, so far, and I recommend it.

Usage: String yourData = LoadData("YourDataFile.txt");

Where YourDataFile.txt is assumed to reside in assets/

 public String LoadData(String inFile) {
        String tContents = "";

    try {
        InputStream stream = getAssets().open(inFile);

        int size = stream.available();
        byte[] buffer = new byte[size];
        stream.read(buffer);
        stream.close();
        tContents = new String(buffer);
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // Handle exceptions here
    }

    return tContents;

 }

EDIT. Apparent issue: this function might return this string:

'android.content.res.AssetManager$AssetInputStream@[code]'

instead of the file contents. I am unable yet to reproduce the problem. Until I update my answer when I get what the problem is, consider the code above 'probably unreliable'.

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My return string is android.content.res.AssetManager$AssetInputStream@4195dfa0 .. –  Paul Oct 18 at 7:31
    
same here, res.AssetManager$AssetInputStream@.... any particular reason why it is returning this? –  Bigs Oct 25 at 20:25
    
That's weird. It worked perfectly in all kinds of tests. I will investigate a bit and get back to you. Might take a few days, pretty busy this coming week. –  Florin Mircea Oct 26 at 18:35
AssetManager assetManager = getAssets();
InputStream inputStream = null;
try {
    inputStream = assetManager.open("helloworld.txt");
}
catch (IOException e){
    Log.e("message: ",e.getMessage());
}
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getAssets() method will work when you are calling inside the Activity class.

If you calling this method in non-Activity class then you need to call this method from Context which is passed from Activity class. So below is the line by you can access the method.

ContextInstance.getAssets();

ContextInstance may be passed as this of Activity class.

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