Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is a long string of which the structure is <A>N</C></B> <B >E</B> <B >N</B> and repeats many times. (A,B,C,E,N each represents different string)
eg:
<target="FmRight">200910102</A></TD> <TD Nowrap >alvin</TD> <TD Nowrap >93</TD> <target="FmRight">200910103</A></TD> <TD Nowrap >Tom</TD> <TD Nowrap >85</TD>

I want to retrieve the string between the tag , so I wrote two regular expressions

"target=\"FmRight\">\\d+"

"<TD Nowrap >[^<]*</TD>"

and here is the test code

    Pattern p1 = Pattern.compile("target=\"FmRight\">\\d+");
    Pattern p2 = Pattern.compile("<TD Nowrap >[^<]*</TD>");
    Matcher m = p1.matcher(text);
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
        if(m.find())
            System.out.println(m.group().split(">")[1]);
        m.usePattern(p2);
        count=0;
        for(int j=0;j<2;j++){
            if(m.find())
                System.out.println(m.group().split(">")[1].split("<")[0]);
        }
        m.usePattern(p1);
        count=1;
    }

In jre,it will run properly,but in android, it won't .
Because in java usePattern()

This method causes this matcher to lose information about the groups of the last match that occurred. The matcher's position in the input is maintained and its last append position is unaffected.

in android usePattern()

Sets a new pattern for the Matcher. Results of a previous find get lost. The next attempt >to find an occurrence of the Pattern in the string will start at the beginning of the >input.

so,how can I maintain the input position while changing the Pattern in android??

share|improve this question
1  
This looks like XML. If it is, why not use an XML parser? –  Jon Skeet Mar 3 '12 at 9:30
    
If you are trying to parse XML, you should probably use an XML parser. Regular expressions aren't very convenient/readable/maintainable/usable for this sort of thing. –  Mark Byers Mar 3 '12 at 9:31
    
Actually it looks like HTML (with the NOWRAP attribute having no value), but a similar point still stands. –  Joachim Sauer Mar 3 '12 at 9:35
    
well,actually this is a html file contains many students grades. –  fearless Mar 3 '12 at 9:38
    
yeah,I think I can use XML parser to parse this,I am going to try this.Reply later. –  fearless Mar 3 '12 at 9:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the region() method to force the Matcher to start looking from the position where the last find() ended.

Pattern p1 = Pattern.compile("target=\"FmRight\">\\d+");
Pattern p2 = Pattern.compile("<TD Nowrap >[^<]*</TD>");
Matcher m = p1.matcher(text);
int count = 0;
int regionStart= 0;                          // <-----
for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    if(m.find()) {
        regionStart = m.end();               // <-----
        System.out.println(m.group().split(">")[1]);
    }
    m.usePattern(p2);
    m.region(regionStart, m.regionEnd());    // <-----
    count=0;
    for(int j=0;j<2;j++){
        if(m.find()) {
            regionStart = m.end();           // <-----
            System.out.println(m.group().split(">")[1].split("<")[0]);
        }
    }
    m.usePattern(p1);
    m.region(regionStart, m.regionEnd());    // <-----
    count=1;
}

EDIT: Correction: you should be able to do this. I don't speak Android, so I don't know if they've messed this up, too. :-/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer!I am a sort of new to the java regex package and don't familiar with all the method.I will study hard.Thanks again. –  fearless Mar 3 '12 at 13:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.