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Morning,

I'm trying to split a large text file (15,000,000 rows) using StreamReader/StreamWriter. Is there a quicker way?

I tested it with 130,000 rows and it took 2min 40sec which implies 15,000,000 rows will take approx 5hrs which seems a bit excessive.

//Perform split.
public void SplitFiles(int[] newFiles, string filePath, int processorCount)
{
    using (StreamReader Reader = new StreamReader(filePath))
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < newFiles.Length; i++)
        {
            string extension = System.IO.Path.GetExtension(filePath);
            string temp = filePath.Substring(0, filePath.Length - extension.Length)
                              + i.ToString();
            string FilePath = temp + extension;

            if (!File.Exists(FilePath))
            {
                for (int x = 0; x < newFiles[i]; x++)
                {
                    DataWriter(Reader.ReadLine(), FilePath);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

public void DataWriter(string rowData, string filePath)
{
    bool appendData = true;
    using (StreamWriter sr = new StreamWriter(filePath, appendData))
    {
        {
            sr.WriteLine(rowData);
        }
    }
}

Thanks for your help.

share|improve this question
    
You'll need to add back the code block and format it properly by indenting it 4 spaces. Otherwise, nobody can answer this question, but yes, 2min40sec for 130K lines is a bit much, I suspect you're doing something wrong, or doing something else as well which is impacting the time. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 3 '12 at 10:08
1  
I'm not really sure what and how you're trying to split, but for best performance you wouldn't want to open the file for each line you write. –  Andre Loker Mar 3 '12 at 10:08
    
Why are you appending 1 line at a time to that other file, opening and closing it each time? That will surely impact the time you're looking at. And what value is in newFiles[i], the number of lines? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 3 '12 at 10:09
    
@Lasse: Its an array containing the number of files i want to create. Should i be populating an array via the streamreader and then passing that to the streamwriter to write? Thanks. –  Hans Rudel Mar 3 '12 at 10:19
    
You should avoid opening up the target files for each line. Open them up once, and keep them around for the entire duration of writing to them. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Mar 3 '12 at 10:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You haven't made it very clear, but I'm assuming that the value of each element of the newFiles array is the number of lines to copy from the original into that file. Note that currently you don't detect the situation where there's either extra data at the end of the input file, or it's shorter than expected. I suspect you want something like this:

public void SplitFiles(int[] newFiles, string inputFile)
{
    string baseName = Path.GetFilenameWithoutExtension(inputFile);
    string extension = Path.GetExtension(inputFile);
    using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText(inputFile))
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < newFiles.Length; i++)
        {
            string outputFile = baseName + i + extension;
            if (File.Exists(outputFile))
            {
                // Better than silently returning, I'd suggest...
                throw new IOException("File already exists: " + outputFile);
            }

            int linesToCopy = newFiles[i];
            using (TextWriter writer = File.CreateText(outputFile))
            {
                for (int j = 0; i < linesToCopy; j++)
                {
                    string line = reader.ReadLine();
                    if (line == null)
                    {
                        return; // Premature end of input
                    }
                    writer.WriteLine(line);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that this still won't detect if there's any unconsumed input... it's not clear what you want to do in that situation.

One option for code clarity is to extract the middle of this into a separate method:

public void SplitFiles(int[] newFiles, string inputFile)
{
    string baseName = Path.GetFilenameWithoutExtension(inputFile);
    string extension = Path.GetExtension(inputFile);
    using (TextReader reader = File.OpenText(inputFile))
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < newFiles.Length; i++)
        {
            string outputFile = baseName + i + extension;
            // Could put this into the CopyLines method if you wanted
            if (File.Exists(outputFile))
            {
                // Better than silently returning, I'd suggest...
                throw new IOException("File already exists: " + outputFile);
            }

            CopyLines(reader, outputFile, newFiles[i]);
        }
    }
}

private static void CopyLines(TextReader reader, string outputFile, int count)
{
    using (TextWriter writer = File.CreateText(outputFile))
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            string line = reader.ReadLine();
            if (line == null)
            {
                return; // Premature end of input
            }
            writer.WriteLine(line);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for not making this particularly clear (one of my comments was wrong) You are correct, the newFile[] contains x elements => number of new files. Each element contains the number of rows per file. ie newFile[2]{10,20} = 2 new files. First file = 10 rows. 2nd file = 20 rows. . –  Hans Rudel Mar 3 '12 at 10:39
    
@HansRudel: So what do you want to happen if the input has 40 lines? What if it only has 25? –  Jon Skeet Mar 3 '12 at 10:39
    
I have a method which populates this array depending on the number of processors. So that part is ok, but i figured i was doing something stupid when it took such a long time to split the file. –  Hans Rudel Mar 3 '12 at 10:43
    
@HansRudel: You may well want to adjust this code for filename generation. Ideally separate that into a separate method - it's slightly messy at the moment. The core copying part should be right though. –  Jon Skeet Mar 3 '12 at 10:45
    
Duly noted. Thanks very much for your + everyone else's help, its much appreciated. –  Hans Rudel Mar 3 '12 at 10:48

There are utilities for splitting files that may outperform your solution - e.g. search for "split file by line".

If they don't suit, there are solutions for loading all the source file into memory and then writing out the files but that probably isn't appropriate given the size of the source file.

In terms of improving your code, a minor improvement would be the generation of the destination file path (and also clarifying the confusing between the source filePath you use and the destination files). You don't need to re-establish the source file extension each time in your loop.

The second improvement (and probably more significant improvement - as highlighted by commenters) is about how you write out the destination files - these seem to have a differing number of lines from the source (value in each newFiles entry) that you specify you want in individual destination files? So I'd suggest for each entry you read all the source file relevant to the next destination file, then output the destination rather than repeatedly opening a destination file. You could "gather" the lines in a StringBuilder/List etc - alternatively just write them directly out to the destination file (but only opening it once)

    public void SplitFiles(int[] newFiles, string sourceFilePath, int processorCount)
    {
        string sourceDirectory = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(sourceFilePath);
        string sourceFileName = System.IO.Path.GetFileNameWithoutExtension(sourceFilePath);
        string extension = System.IO.Path.GetExtension(sourceFilePath);

        using (StreamReader Reader = new StreamReader(sourceFilePath))
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < newFiles.Length; i++)
            {
                string destinationFileNameWithExtension = string.Format("{0}{1}{2}", sourceFileName, i, extension);

                string destinationFilePath = System.IO.Path.Combine(sourceDirectory, destinationFileNameWithExtension);

                if (!File.Exists(destinationFilePath))
                {
                    // Read all the lines relevant to this destination file
                    // and temporarily store them in memory
                    StringBuilder destinationText = new StringBuilder();
                    for (int x = 0; x < newFiles[i]; x++)
                    {
                        destinationText.Append(Reader.ReadLine());
                    }
                    DataWriter(destinationFilePath, destinationText.ToString());
                }
                else
                {
                    return;
                }
            }
        }
    }

private static void DataWriter(string destinationFilePath, string content)
{
    using (StreamWriter sr = new StreamWriter(destinationFilePath))
    {
        {
            sr.Write(content);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I see no need for reading a load of data into memory. Just avoiding the repeated opening/closing should be fine. –  Jon Skeet Mar 3 '12 at 10:32
    
Thanks for the generation of the destinationFilePath, thats quite nice. –  Hans Rudel Mar 3 '12 at 10:40
    
@JonSkeet - this is why I said "probably isn't appropriate" :-) The key was to not repeat the (relatively trivial) action of string manipulation and the more significant action of repeatedly opening & closing the destination files –  kaj Mar 3 '12 at 10:40

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