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I just started learning ruby. Now I need to figure out the dimension of a multidimensional array. I had a look at ruby-docs for the all the array methods, but I could not find a method that returns the dimension.

Here is an example:

For [[1, 2],[3,4],[5,6]] the dimension should be 2.

For [[[1,2],[2,3]],[[3,4],[5]]], the dimension should be 3.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is not a built-in function for that as there may be multiple definition as to what you mean by "dimension" for an array. Ruby's arrays may contain anything including hashes or other arrays. That's why I believe you need to implement your own function for that.

Asuming that by dimension you mean "the deepest nested level of arrays" this should do the trick:

def get_dimension a
  return 0 if a.class != Array
  result = 1
  a.each do |sub_a|
    if sub_a.class = Array
      dim = get_dimension(sub_a)
      result = dim + 1 if dim + 1 > result
    end
  end
  return result
end

EDIT: and as ruby is a great language and allows you to do some fancy stuff you can also make get_dimension a method of Array:

 class Array
   def get_dimension
   ... # code from above slightly modified
   end
 end
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if sub_a.class == Array –  Short Jul 4 '13 at 0:09

Simple, object-oriented solution.

class Array
  def depth
    map {|element| element.depth + 1 }.max
  end
end

class Object
  def depth
    0
  end
end
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in the simplest case

depth = Proc.new do |array|
  depth = 1
  while Array === array.first do
    array = array.first
    depth += 1
  end
  depth
end

array =  [[[1,2],[2,3]],[[3,4],[5]]]    
depth.call(array)
#=> 3

Or this tiny recursive method

def depth(array, depth=1)
  array = array.send(:first)
  Array === array ? depth(array, depth+1) : depth
end

array =  [[[1,2],[2,3]],[[3,4],[5]]]    
depth(array)
#=> 3
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Why proc, not regular function? –  Sergio Tulentsev Mar 3 '12 at 11:34
    
I am not sure, doc %) It is behavior-driven stuff. I was in the console and I usually use procs in console. Of course it could be rewritten as an usual method –  fl00r Mar 3 '12 at 11:39
    
I'm just curious, that's all :) –  Sergio Tulentsev Mar 3 '12 at 11:41
1  
I think this will not work for instance in such a case: a = [1, [2,3]]. The output of your function will be 1 while in fact I believe we want to get 2. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 3 '12 at 12:17
    
I believe he is talking about "matrix" –  fl00r Mar 3 '12 at 12:28

How about:

class Object
    def dimension
        self.class == Array ? 1 + self[0].dimension : 0
    end
end
[[[1,2],[2,3]],[[3,4],[5]]].dimension
#=> 3
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again this will not work in the case a = [3, [1,2]]. The output will be 1 instead of 2. A slight modification will make it work for that case, though. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Mar 3 '12 at 12:23
    
@izomorphius - It seems to me that 1 is the right value in that case. You're right that the question doesn't make it clear though. –  pguardiario Mar 3 '12 at 13:03

As a modification of Tass's approach:

class Array
    def depth
        map{ |element| element.is_a?( Vector ) ? element.depth + 1 : 1 }.max 
    end
end

Keeps depth as a method of Array, and doesn't require adding a method to Object.

Of course, that might be what you want if you are going to call my_object.depth, where you don't know in advance that my_object.class == Array

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