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Hi I want to hash a string of length upto 30. What will be the best idea to do that if time is my concern. The function will be called wover 100million times. currently I am using this,

static UInt64 CalculateHash(string read, bool lowTolerance)
{
    UInt64 hashedValue = 0;
    int i = 0;
    while (i < read.Length)
    {
        hashedValue += read.ElementAt(i) * (UInt64)Math.Pow(31, i);
        if (lowTolerance) i += 2;
        else i++;
    }
    return hashedValue;
}
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4  
Is there a reason that the Object.GetHashCode() method won't work for you? It seems like you're pretty much reimplementing the same concept. –  Ken Wayne VanderLinde Mar 3 '12 at 11:20
2  
Anything that doesn't use floating point math will be faster. –  David Schwartz Mar 3 '12 at 11:21
1  
I still don't understand what's wrong with the standard string hash-code functinn. If you need to persist it, calculating 100,000,000 hashes is going to take a fraction of the time it takes to actually store them to a database. –  zmbq Mar 3 '12 at 11:44
2  
@Pbasak Then cast it to uint or mask it with 0x7FFFFF. –  CodesInChaos Mar 3 '12 at 13:36
10  
Run a profiler. That will tell you what the slow part is. Then fix the slow part. –  Eric Lippert Mar 3 '12 at 15:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted
static UInt64 CalculateHash(string read)
{
    UInt64 hashedValue = 3074457345618258791ul;
    for(int i=0; i<read.Length; i++)
    {
        hashedValue += read[i];
        hashedValue *= 3074457345618258799ul;
    }
    return hashedValue;
}

This is a Knuth hash. You can also use Jenkins.

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4  
+1 for quoting Knuth. –  zmbq Mar 3 '12 at 11:43
    
According to my own test, this function does not achieve avalanche. YMMV. –  Fantius May 28 '12 at 9:58
    
@Fantius: Can you try using 11400714819306691477ul instead, please. (For both values.) –  David Schwartz May 28 '12 at 10:13
1  
It's worse. But I should quantify my original statement. Toggling a single bit on the input results in about 49.40% of the output bits toggling (using your original constant), which is MUCH better than Bernstein-based functions. That's probably good enough for most uses. But, for instance, SuperFastHash (landman-code.blogspot.com/2009/02/…) is giving me 50.02%. And Murmur2 on the same page is giving me 50.04%. –  Fantius May 28 '12 at 11:31
1  
It's not intended for applications where you care about that. It's just intended to be used to distribute strings in a hash table. –  David Schwartz May 28 '12 at 11:34

First of all, consider using GetHashCode().

A simple improvement on your existing implementation:

static UInt64 CalculateHash(string read, bool lowTolerance)
{
    UInt64 hashedValue = 0;
    int i = 0;
    ulong multiplier = 1;
    while (i < read.Length)
    {
        hashedValue += read[i] * multiplier;
        multiplier *= 37;
        if (lowTolerance) i += 2;
        else i++;
    }
    return hashedValue;
}

It avoids the expensive floating point calculation, and the overhead of ElementAt.

Btw (UInt64)Math.Pow(31, i) doesn't work well for longer strings. Floating point rounding will lead to a multiplier of 0 for characters beyond 15 or so.

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The multiplier must start at a prime value greater than 256 or this breaks horribly if the first byte is small. –  David Schwartz Mar 3 '12 at 11:30
    
@DavidSchwartz A larger prime is certainly better, but breaking horribly is a bit of an overstatement. –  CodesInChaos Mar 3 '12 at 11:33
    
If a 64-bit hash function has numerous 2-byte inputs that collide, IMO it breaks horribly. (But given how awful the function the OP started with, maybe my standards are too high.) –  David Schwartz Mar 3 '12 at 11:35
    
Even with a prime >256 but <65536 there will be two char collisions. C# works on UTF-16 codepoints, not single byte chars. –  CodesInChaos Mar 3 '12 at 11:38

To speed up your implementation, the (UInt64)Math.Pow(31, i) call should be replaced by a lookup: pre-calculate a table of the first 30 powers of 31, and use it at runtime. Since the limit on length is 30, you need only 31 element:

private static unsigned long[] Pow31 = new unsigned long[31];

static HashCalc() {
    Pow31[0] = 1;
    for (int i = 1 ; i != Pow31.Length ; i++) {
        Pow31[i] = 31*Pow31[i-1];
    }
}

// In your hash function...
hashedValue += read.ElementAt(i) * Pow31[i];
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I wouldn't be so sure that a table lookup is faster than an integer multiplication. –  CodesInChaos Mar 3 '12 at 11:41
    
@CodeInChaos It's certainly faster than Math.Pow(31, i). Also I'd need a additional multiplication when i goes up by 2 inside a condition, so I'd try the lookup first. –  dasblinkenlight Mar 3 '12 at 11:45

I have played with Paul Hsieh's implementations, and seem to be fast with little collisions (for my scenarios anyway)

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Yeah sorry, read the question differently the first time. Edited! –  skub Mar 3 '12 at 11:27
    
hi it looks better. I will implement it in c# and will see. –  P basak Mar 3 '12 at 12:59

I don't think this is a good function. Starting from i == 13 the result of (UInt64)Math.Pow(31, i) will be always 0

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1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  decPL Apr 10 at 8:36

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