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There is a table t which has inherited children. I want that only the children can receive inserts. What is the best way to force that the parent table rejects inserts?

create table t (c int);
create table t1 () inherits (t);

This should not be possible:

insert into t (c) values (1);

EDIT:

I found a model visible solution in addition to the one from @wildplasser:

create table tfk (c integer unique check(false));
create table t (c integer, foreign key (c) references tfk(c));

Now it is not possible to insert into t UNLESS it is a null value, and still possible to insert into its children. It can be a good solution if that columnn is already constrained as not null but not enough otherwise. Or does someone know a trick to make the above work for null values?

News:

I asked for a new syntax in the postgresql list and it was done for 9.2:

Allow CHECK constraints to be declared NO INHERIT (Nikhil Sontakke, Alex Hunsaker)

This makes them enforceable only on the parent table, not on child tables.

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3  
Have you tried permissions? Seems like just not granting the relevant user permission should work. –  derobert Mar 3 '12 at 11:41
    
@derobert Even if a privilege is revoked from a role that role could still retain it if, say, public or another role of which it is member still has it. What I'm looking for is a definitive and unequivocal action. –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 3 '12 at 15:47
    
This seems more a philosophical problem than a practical requirement. If you ensure that only the owner has the right to insert, yet believe that right could "accidentally" be handed out, then so too could the right to remove any constraint or trigger you use to stop it. I understand you're looking for the PostgreSQL equivalent to an "abstract class" but there just isn't one. Looking into it triggers will work as they don't apply to child tables (although I previously thought otherwise). This will at least prevent accidental insertion. –  couling Mar 3 '12 at 17:31
    
@couling Dropping a constraint or trigger is an exclusive privilege of the owner (or superuser) and is an intentional data definition act, not an accident. An insert yes, can be an accident. This question is a very practical requirement. Just yesterday I, when logged as the table owner, accidentally inserted in the parent table which caused me lots of work to fix. An abstract class is a good figure here and could be part of good answer from you. Please read the faq before downvoting a question (revenge is not a reason to). –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 3 '12 at 18:07
    
In general permissions are the way to prevent insert on a table. The two answers you previously gave for permissions not being what you need (to me and to Robert) made no sense. The down vote was for not stating your requirements clearly. But thanks, I didn't actually know how down voted my answer. And thanks for stating your requirement clearly now. Add them to your question and I'll up vote it. Regards –  couling Mar 4 '12 at 8:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use a before insert trigger to raise an error or redirect to the correct table.

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This is ugly, but it appears to work:

--SET search_path='tmp';

DROP TABLE dontinsert CASCADE;
CREATE TABLE dontinsert
        ( id INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        );

DROP TABLE doinsert CASCADE;
CREATE TABLE doinsert ()
        INHERITS (dontinsert)
        ;

CREATE RULE dont_do_it AS
        ON INSERT TO dontinsert
        DO INSTEAD NOTHING
        ;

INSERT INTO dontinsert(id) VALUES( 13) ;

INSERT INTO doinsert(id) VALUES( 42) ;

SELECT id AS id_from_dont FROM dontinsert;

SELECT id AS id_from_do FROM doinsert;

Result:

SET
NOTICE:  drop cascades to table doinsert
DROP TABLE
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / PRIMARY KEY will create implicit index "dontinsert_pkey" for table "dontinsert"
CREATE TABLE
ERROR:  table "doinsert" does not exist
CREATE TABLE
CREATE RULE
INSERT 0 0
INSERT 0 1
 id_from_dont 
--------------
           42
(1 row)

 id_from_do 
------------
         42
(1 row)

UPDATE: since the OP wants INSERTSs to fail with a lot of noise, I had to add a canary-table with an impossible constraint imposed on it:

DROP TABLE alwaysempty CASCADE;
CREATE TABLE alwaysempty
        ( id INTEGER NOT NULL
        );

ALTER TABLE alwaysempty
        ADD CONSTRAINT dont_insert_you_sucker CHECK (id > 0 AND id < 0)
        ;

CREATE RULE dont_do_it AS
        ON INSERT TO dontinsert
        DO INSTEAD -- NOTHING
        INSERT INTO alwaysempty (id)
        VALUES (NEW.id)
        ;

The new output:

SET
NOTICE:  drop cascades to table doinsert
DROP TABLE
NOTICE:  CREATE TABLE / PRIMARY KEY will create implicit index "dontinsert_pkey" for table "dontinsert"
CREATE TABLE
ERROR:  table "doinsert" does not exist
CREATE TABLE
DROP TABLE
CREATE TABLE
ALTER TABLE
CREATE RULE
ERROR:  new row for relation "alwaysempty" violates check constraint "dont_insert_you_sucker"
INSERT 0 1
 id_from_dont 
--------------
           42
(1 row)

 id_from_do 
------------
         42
(1 row)

Next attempt: move (ONLY) the basetable into an unreacheable schema (since I really hate triggers) ...

SET search_path='tmp';

DROP SCHEMA hidden CASCADE;
CREATE SCHEMA hidden;
REVOKE ALL ON SCHEMA hidden FROM PUBLIC;

DROP TABLE dontinsert CASCADE;
CREATE TABLE dontinsert
        ( id INTEGER NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY
        );

DROP TABLE doinsert CASCADE;
CREATE TABLE doinsert ()
        INHERITS (dontinsert)
        ;

ALTER TABLE ONLY dontinsert SET SCHEMA hidden;

INSERT INTO alwaysempty (id) VALUES (NEW.id) ;

INSERT INTO dontinsert(id) VALUES( 13) ;

INSERT INTO doinsert(id) VALUES( 42) ;

SELECT id AS id_from_dont FROM hidden.dontinsert;

SELECT id AS id_from_do FROM doinsert;
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think a rule is ugly. Indeed I see it as more elegant in its simplicity than a trigger. So I voted you answer up. But I want an exception to be raised on insert which is not possible for a rule. Or is it? –  Clodoaldo Neto Mar 3 '12 at 16:35
    
Well, you can do almost everything with a rule. I'll look into it. –  wildplasser Mar 3 '12 at 16:37
1  
Problem with a rule is it rewrites queries. Test it with copy from stdin, and it should then insert. A trigger is the answer. –  Scott Marlowe Mar 3 '12 at 17:44
    
Problem with copy is that it doesn't rewrite queries. Usage of COPY is more-or-less restricted to DBA's; which are supposed to know what they are doing. –  wildplasser Mar 3 '12 at 18:28
1  
Been there. Actually, I am beyond triggers Triggers make your database act like a spreadsheet on steroids. If there is another way to reach your goal: avoid them. The real bad thing about triggers is that they cannot be imposed by the database model or schema. To the model, they are invisible. They are an extra hidden layer. –  wildplasser Mar 4 '12 at 16:36
create table t (c int, check (false) no inherit);

This will prevent inserts into table t. It adds a constraint that will never be true, so no data can be inserted. no inherit will prevent that constraint from affecting child tables.

share|improve this answer
    
That was only introduced in 9.2 and I pointed it in an update to my question. –  Clodoaldo Neto May 30 '13 at 9:18

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