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I know java is a very sensitive language. But accidentally I wrote a java statement with two semicolons. The java compiler does not show any error and it runs. I wrote the following line:

 ........
 System.out.println("Length after delete the text is "+name.length());;
 ..........

For learning purpose I tried adding different characters after the semicolon, and the java compiler has shown the compile time error as Syntax error on token ")", delete this token.

I wrote the following statement

   System.out.println("Length after delete the text is "+name.length());)

I do not know the reason; how is it possible? Why does java treat the semicolon and other characters as different? Please help me.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Because a double semicolon is not treated as a double semicolon but as a semicolon plus an empty statement. And an empty statement, which does nothing, is not an error.

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2  
+1, Exactly, it is very much like writing {}{}{}{} (braces I mean) inside your code anywhere. –  nIcE cOw Mar 3 '12 at 13:27
1  
Thanks i cleared now. i thing some related points like your answer that is we use semicolon to end the statement But i did not know the second semicolon is a empty operator. –  murali_ma Mar 3 '12 at 13:35
2  
Actually, it is an empty statement. There is no thing like an empty expression in Java. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Mar 3 '12 at 16:59
    
Sorry for not using the exact terminology. Corrected. –  user529758 Mar 3 '12 at 17:57
1  
Note that you can ask eclipse to flag empty statements with a warning. –  haylem Mar 3 '12 at 19:28

According to the Java language standard, the second semicolon is an empty statement.

An empty statement does nothing.

EmptyStatement:
    ;

Execution of an empty statement always completes normally.

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1  
+1 for referencing the JLS –  Mark Rotteveel Mar 3 '12 at 13:31

Actually, there are cases where a double semicolon does produce an error:

public int method() {
   return 1;;
}

When the compiler determines that a location is not reachable (and this is defined exactly in the JLS, but includes the locations directly after a return, break, continue and throw), no statement is allowed there, not even an empty one.

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; by itself is an empty operator, so you effectively have two operators in the original case.

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Thanks i cleared now. i thing some related points like your answer that is we use semicolon to end the statement But i did not know the second semicolon is a empty operator. –  murali_ma Mar 3 '12 at 13:36
    
+1, for this info. –  nIcE cOw Mar 3 '12 at 15:27

The semicolon ends the sentence.

System.out.println("Length after delete the text is "+name.length());;

The second semicolon means the sentence is empty.

System.out.println("Length after delete the text is "+name.length());)

Is wrong because you're trying to finish an uncompleted sentence.

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Because it is not error? Why you are asking about java? This is in most languages with similar syntax...

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