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I've spent last 24 hours bashing my head against the wall trying to solve this problem. I already know that on this board there are at least 10 similar questions. Why I'm still asking? Well, because no solution seems to work :). Here's the code:

class MyAdminForm(forms.ModelForm):   
    some_field = forms.CharField()

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(MyAdminForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

        for i in range(0, 10):
            self.fields['file_field_%d' % i] = forms.FileField()

This code renders only some_field, and nothing else. It doesn't seem to care I'm adding 10 filefields. Django ver is 1.3.1

share|improve this question
    
That looks ok to me. Can you update your question to include the code you're using to display the model form? –  Alasdair Mar 3 '12 at 17:56
    
Well actually that's all the code :) + this: class MyAdmin(admin.ModelAdmin): form = MyAdminForm –  Szworny Dziąch Mar 3 '12 at 22:15
1  
Ok, so you're trying to use the form in the Django admin ... that makes things trickier. As I said before, your model form looks fine to me, and would work in a regular view. I don't know where the problem is in the Django admin. You can start digging around options.py, hope that somebody else on Stack Overflow knows the answer, or take it as a sign that you're trying to do too much customisation in the Django admin, and that it's time to write your own view. –  Alasdair Mar 3 '12 at 22:39
    
That was actually the idea I came up with - that maybe I should write my own view, but on the other hand it's hard to believe that django developers made such a bug... –  Szworny Dziąch Mar 3 '12 at 22:51
    
You'll come across issues like this from time to time. It doesn't mean that the Django admin is bad, just that it wasn't designed with this use case in mind. –  Alasdair Mar 3 '12 at 23:25

1 Answer 1

Adding fields before calling __init__() of base class worked for me.

class MyAdminForm(forms.ModelForm):   
    some_field = forms.CharField()

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        for i in range(0, 10):
            self.fields['file_field_%d' % i] = forms.FileField()

        super(MyAdminForm, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)

If you don't need variable number of fields in every instance of the form, modifying only the base_fields class property should work too.

class MyAdminForm(forms.ModelForm):   
    some_field = forms.CharField()

for i in range(0, 10):
    MyAdminForm.base_fields['file_field_%d' % i] = forms.FileField()
share|improve this answer
    
I got error saying: 'MyAdminForm' object has no attribute 'fields'. When I initialized fields before loop it didn't work also... –  Szworny Dziąch Mar 3 '12 at 22:14
    
One more thing - these FileFields are being added to self.fields - I looped over it in some core django method, and they were there. –  Szworny Dziąch Mar 3 '12 at 22:18

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