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This seems almost right but it chokes on the newline. What's the best way to do this?

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    var z float64
    var a []float64
    // \n gives an error for Fscanf
    s := "3.25 -12.6 33.7 \n 3.47"
    in := strings.NewReader(s)
    for {
        n, err := fmt.Fscanf(in, "%f", &z)
        fmt.Println("n", n)
        if err != nil {
            break
        }
        a = append(a, z)
    }
    fmt.Println(a)
}

Output:

n 1
n 1
n 1
n 0
[3.25 -12.6 33.7]

Update:

See the answer from @Atom below. I found another way which is to break if the error is EOF, and otherwise just ignore it. It's just a hack, I know, but I control the source.

    _, err := fmt.Fscanf(in, "%f", &z)
    if err == os.EOF { break }
    if err != nil { continue }
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you are parsing floats only, you can use fmt.Fscan(r io.Reader, a ...interface{}) instead of fmt.Fscanf(r io.Reader, format string, a ...interface{}):

var z float64
...
n, err := fmt.Fscan(in, &z)

The difference between fmt.Fscan and fmt.Fscanf is that in the case of fmt.Fscan newlines count as space. The latter function (with a format string) does not treat newlines as spaces and requires newlines in the input to match newlines in the format string.

The functions with a format string give more control over the form of input, such as when you need to scan %5f or %10s. In this case, if the input contains newlines and it implements the interface io.RuneScanner you can use the method ReadRune to peek the next character and optionally unread it with UnreadRune if it isn't a space or a newline.

share|improve this answer
    
It's embarrassing. I saw this function in the docs, but didn't know what to make of the a ...interface{}. Then I found an example to copy that had Fscanf with &z as argument and I didn't think to go back to Fscan. However, I still don't know what that function signature means. Haven't found anything that would explain it yet. –  telliott99 Mar 3 '12 at 22:00
1  
The documentation for package fmt is explaining the a ...interface{} with the following sentence: "All arguments to be scanned must be either pointers to basic types or implementations of the Scanner interface". –  Atom Mar 4 '12 at 12:29

If your input is just a bunch of lines with floats separated by white space on each line, it might be easier to just read one line at a time from the file, run Sscanf on that line (assuming the number of floats on each line is fixed). But here's something that works in your example---there may be a way to make it more efficient.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "strings"
)

func main() {
    var z float64
    var a []float64
    // \n gives an error for Fscanf
    s := "3.25 -12.6 33.7 \n 3.47"
    for _, line := range strings.Split(s, "\n") {
        in := strings.NewReader(line)
        for {
            n, err := fmt.Fscanf(in, "%f", &z)
            fmt.Println("n", n)
            if err != nil {
                fmt.Printf("ERROR: %v\n", err)
                break
            }
            a = append(a, z)
        }
    }
    fmt.Println(a)
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I know I can split first. Was hoping for deeper understanding. Meanwhile, I can make it work by doing "if err == os.EOF { break }" then "if err != nil { continue }" but it seems like a hack. Not sure which error corresponds to "unexpected newline." –  telliott99 Mar 3 '12 at 18:32

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